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speak that which we do know, and testify that which we have se

The ellipsis of the verb is used in the following instances: The man was old and crafty; that is, the man was old, and the man was crafty: Thou art poor, and wretched, and miserable, and blind, and naked. If we would fill up the ellipsis in the last sentence, thou art ought to be repeated before each of the adjectives.

If in such enumerations, we choose to point out one property above the rest, that property must be placed last, and the ellipsis supplied; as, She is young and beautiful, and she is good.

I went to see and hear him; that is, I went to see and I went to hear him. In this instance there is not only an ellipsis of the governing word went, but likewise of the sign of the infinitive mood.

Do, did, have, had, shall, will, may, might, and the rest of the auxiliaries of the compound tenses, are frequently used alone, to spare the repetition of the verb; as, He regards his word, but thou dost not; i. e. dost not regard it: We succeeded, but they did not; did not succeed: I have learned my task, but thou hast not; hast not learned. They must and they shall be punished; that is, they must be punished.

T'he ellipsis of the adverb is used in the following manner: He spoke and acted wisely, that is, He spoke wisely, and he acted wisely.

Thrice I went and offered my service; that is Thrice I went, and thrice I offered my service.

The ellipsis of the preposition, as well as of the verb, is seen in the following instances: He went into the abbeys, halls, and public buildings; that is, he went into the abbeys, he went into the halls, and ho went into the public buildings. He also went through all the streets and laces of the city; that is Through all the streets, and through all the lanes, &c. He spoke to every man and woman there; that is, to every man and to every woman.

The ellipsis of the conjunction is as follows: They confess the power, wisdom, goodness and love of their Creator; i. e. the power and wisdom, and goodness, and love of, &c.

Though I love him, I do not flatter him; that is, Though I love him, yet I do not flatter him. The ellipsis of the interjection is not very

common; it, however, is sometimes used; as, O the soft enmity! endearing strife! that is, o the soft enmity! O the endearing strife!

SPECIMEN OF PARSING. To parse a word is to tell its properties and grammatical relations. To parse a sentence, is to describe the properties of all the parts of speech of which it is composed, and show their mutual relations and dependencies; as in the following example:

« Henry's hand trembles." Henry's is a proper noun of the masculine gender, third person, singular number, possessive case, and governed by hand, agreeably to Rule VI. (repeat it.) Hand is a common noun, of the neuter gender, third person, singular number, nominative case to trembles. Rule I. (repeat it.) Trembles, is.a regular, transitive verb, indicative mood, present tense, third person, singular number, and agrees with hand. Rule II. (repeat it.)

Why is Henry's a noun? Because it is the name of something. Why a proper noun? It is appropriated to an individual. Why of the masculine gender? I denotes a person of the male kind. Why third person? It is the person spoken of. Why singular number? It expresses but one. Why possessive case? It implies property or possession. Decline it. Nom. Henry, possess. Henry's, objHenry. Plural, is wanting.

Why is hand a common noun? It is one of a kind or species. Why is it neuter gender? it denotes an object which is neither male nor female, Why is it in the nominative case? It is the subject * of the verb “trembles.")

Why is trembles a verb? It implies action. Why is it called regular? It forms its imperfect tense in ed. Why intransitive? It does not terminate on any object, but the action is confined to the subject, or actor. Why is it in the indicative mood? It simply declares a thing. Why in the present tense? It represents the action as taking place at the time of speaking. Why third person and singular number? Because its nominative is.

Express the participles of the verb tremble.Pres: ent,trembling; Perfect,-trembled; Compound perfect,-having trembled.

Put this verb through the several tenses of the indic. mood, first pers. sing. num. in their order. I tremble, I trembled, I have trembled, I had treiabled, I shall or will tremble, I shall or will have trembled.

Put it through the several moods of the present tense, first person sing. num. Indicative mood, I tremble. Imperative,

-wanting. Potential mood -I may or can tremble. Subjunctive mood.I. I tremble. Infinitive mood, to tremble.

In parsing transitive verbs, the learner should frequently be required to express the verb in the passive voice; as, Transitive, I love;changed into the passive voice, it is I am loved. I rule is transitive; changed into the passive voice, it is I am ruled.

By thus exercising the pupil, -by requiring him, on his first attempt at parsing, to give reasons for disposing of a word in the manner he does, and to express the various changes to which the different parts of speech are subject, declining his nouns,and comparing his adjectives, conjugating his verbs, and putting them through the different moods, tenses and voices, he will very soon acquire that familiarity with all the elementary principles of the science, which will enable him to parse any good English, which is not obscure in its meaning, with readiness and accuracy.

“ The man is happy who lives virtuously."

The is the definite article, relating to man. Man is a common noun, third person, singular number, masculine gender,and nominative case to is. Rulel.

Is is an irregular, intransitive verb, indicative mood, present tense, third person, singular number and agrees with man. Rule 2. Happy is an adjective, in the positive state, and belongs to man. Rule 22. Who is a relative pronoun, referring to man as its antecedent, third person, singular number, masculine gender, and nominative case to lives. Rule 19 & 20. Lives is a regular, intransitive verb, indicative mood, present tense, third person, singular number, and agrees with who. Rule 2. Virtuously is an adverb of manner, and qualifies lives. Rule 23.

Why is the an article? Because it is a word prefixed to a substantive to point it out and limit its signification. Why is it called the definite article? Because it points out the particular subject to which it relates..

Why is man a noun? Because it is the name of something. Why a common noun? Because it is one of a species, or one of many kinds. Why third person? Because it is the person spoken of. Why singular number? Because it expresses but one object. Why masculine gender? Because it denotes an object of the male kind. Why in the nominative case? Because it is the subject of the verb.

Why is is a verb? Because it expresses being or a state of being Why is it irregular? Because it does not form its imperfect tense and perfect participle in d or ed. Why is it intransitive? Because it does not pass over and terminate on any object. Why is it in the indicative mood? Because it is a simple declaration. Why is it present tense? Because it represents the being or state of being ex'pressed, as existing at the time of speaking. * Why is it said to be of the third person and singular number? Because its nominative is.

! Why is happy an adjective? Because it is prefixed to a noun to qualify it. Why is it said to be in the positive state? Because it simply qualifies, without

any increase or diminution in its signification.

Why is who a pronoun? Because it is used instead of a noun.

What noun is it used instead of? Man. Why is it called a relative pronoun? Because it relates to a word going before called

* This is the proper answer when the verb is a neuter intransitive. * passive, the proper answer to the inquiry why it is in the present tense, would be, Because it represents the passion or the receiving of the action as taking place at the time of speaking; if active, Because it represents the action as pansing at the time of speaking. In all cases, the answer should thus be made to correspond with the nature and office of the particular word to which it baw reference

If the verb

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