The Modern Builder's Guide

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Cady & Burgess, 1849 - 119 من الصفحات
 

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الصفحة 114 - Mechanical Powers, are certain simple instruments, commonly employed for raising greater weights, or overcoming greater resistances, than could be effected by the natural strength without them. These are usually accounted six in number, viz. the Lever, the Wheel and Axle, the Pulley, the Inclined Plane, the Wedge, and the Screw.
الصفحة 7 - A diameter of a circle is a straight line drawn through the centre, and terminated both ways by the circumference.
الصفحة 99 - Thus a great quantity of the lime would be dissolved, and the crystallization performed in the most perfect manner. The indefatigable pains and perseverance, for which the Romans were so remarkable in all their undertakings, leave no room to doubt that they would take care to have the ingredients mixed together as well as possible. The consequence of all this is, that the buildings formed in this manner are all as firm as if cut out of a solid rock ; the mortar being equally hard, if not more so,...
الصفحة 85 - Clamp, a piece of wood fixed to the end of a board by mortise and tenon, or by groove and tongue, so that the fibres of the one piece, thus fixed, traverse those of the board, and by this means prevent it from casting: the piece at the end is called a clamp, and the board is said to be clamped.
الصفحة 106 - ... easily got out from the cameo. The casts are made of the finest and purest plaster of Paris, saturated with water ; and the wax mould is oiled previously to its being put in. When the casts, or intaglios, are first taken from the mould, they are not very firm ; but being suffered to dry a little, either in the opei: air or an oven, they acquire sufficient hardness to allow of being scraped and cleaned.
الصفحة 98 - Roman buildings are found to cohere so strongly, as to have caused an opinion that their constructors were acquainted with some kind of mortar, which, in comparison with ours, might justly be called cement ; and that, to our want of knowledge of the materials they used, is owing the great inferiority of modern buildings in their durability. But a proper attention to the above particulars would soon show that the durability of the antient edifices depended on the manner of preparing their mortar more...
الصفحة 95 - ... until as many ounces of lime have passed through the sieve as there are quarts of water in the .butt. Let the water, thus impregnated, stand in the butt...
الصفحة 70 - For the whiteness of the marble, and his own statue joined with them, apparently show them to be of a later age than the first, and done by that Emperor's command. Within the portico on high, and on the outside of the cella of the temple itself, is another border + of basso relievo round about it, or at least on the north and south sides, which, without doubt, is as ancient as the temple, and of admirable work, but not so high a relievo as the other. Thereon are represented sacrifices, processions,...
الصفحة 95 - The best materials for making the cement beinar thus prepared, take fifty-six pounds of the coarse sand, and forty-two pounds of the fine sand ; mix them on a large plank of hard wood placed horizontally; then spread the sand so that it may stand to the height of six inches, with a flat surface on the plank, wet it with the...
الصفحة 95 - ... the coarse rubbish and rubble remain on the sieve to be rejected. Let the sand which thus subsides in the receptacle be washed in clean streaming water through a finer sieve, so as to be further cleansed and sorted into two parcels ; a coarser, which will remain in the sieve, which is to give passage to such grains of sand only as are less than onethirtieth of an inch in diameter, and which is to be saved apart under the name of coarse sand ; and a finer, which will pass through the sieve and...

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