Treatise on Natural Philosophy, المجلد 1،العدد 2

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Bodrigues coordinates new
95
Addition
96
Small addition
97
Somewhat altered
100
Rewritten and enlarged
101
Rewritten
102
Addition
107
Additiontransient terrestrial nntation of 30G davs new
108
Advance in knowledge of tides since the first editionThe
110
Additionrolling and spinning bodies new
111
Additiondynamics of twist in kinks new
123
Small alteration
130
Additionintegral curvature horograph new
137
Wire of any shape disturbed by forces and couples applied
166
Some alteration
184
Plate bent by any forcesConditions of equilibriumEqua
188
190j Addition 198 Rewrittendegrees of freedomgeometrical slide new
198
Symmetrical flexure of flat ringFlexure of flat ring
200
Slight alteration
201
Transmission of force through an elastic solidHomogeneous
206
Slight addition
212
Discrepant reckonings of shear and shearing stress from
219
Units of length and time new
223
c
225
Fundamental problems of mathematical theoryConditions
233
Some addition
235
Part omitted
245
St Venants application to torsion problemsTorsion pro
248
Small addition
267
by a single bending stress by simultaneous
268
Case of 647 independently investigatedKapid decrease
274
Footnote new
276
Definition of Principal axes new
282
Reference added
283
Problem of 696 solved for spherical shellDilatation proved
286
Slight addition
289
Considerable addition new
293
Surfacetractions givenComponent tractions on any spheri
294
Small alterations and additions
298
Small bodies stronger than large ones in proportion to their
300
Fluid pressure depending on external forcesSurfaces of equal
307
Addition
312
316
316
Small alteration
317
I 341 Extended to include old 342 with addition
341
Same as nonmathematical portion of old
343
Physical problems relative to plane rectangular and circular
344
345 i to xxviii Oscillations with frictiondissipation of energyposi tional and motional forcesgyrostaticsstability new
345
Harmonic spheroidal levels of high ordersUndulation of level
352
Determinateness of potential through space from its value over
358
Figure of the sea level determinable from measurements
367
and 374 Same as old
373
to 380 Same as old 375 to 379 with alterations
374
and 382 Same as old
380
to 386 Same as old 381 to 384 Old 385 and 386 omitted
383
398 Harmonic analysis new
393
Equilibrium of rotating spheroid of heterogeneous liquid
398
Addition on calculating machines new
401
Rewritten 405 Footnote quoted from old 830 compare with new S
405
Laplaces hypothetical law of density within the earthAs
406
Slight alteration
408
409 Rewritten
409
Comparison of Laplaces hypothesis with observationThe
415
Numerical estimates of the amount of tidal frictionSecular
420
427
427
Part rewritten 431 Rewritten
431
Extendedbifilar balance new Appendix B I Tidepredicter new II Equationsolver new III to VI Mechanical integrator new VII Harmonic analyser ne...
435
Part rewritten
443
Slightly altered and part omittel
451
Same as part of old 451old 452 omitted
452
and 454 Rewritten
453
Equations of Equilibrium of an Elastic Solid deduced from
461
On the Secular Cooling of the Earth
468
Small omission 4o8 478 and 479 Small addition
478
and 492 Slight alteration
491
Integral of normal attraction over a closed surface new
493
494 a to q Theory of potentialattraction of ellipsoids new
494
Appendix E On the Age of the Suns Heat
495
Small addition
496
Potential in frco space cannot have a maximum or minimum
498
Example added
501
Appendix G On Tidal Friction by G H Darwin
503
Part rewritten
506
Slight alteration
507
Second investigation of attraction of ellipsoidElliptic
519
Distribution of electricity on an ellipsoidal conductor new
520
to 525 Attraction of Homoeoids new including old
522
to 530 Mathematical part of old 519 rewritten 531 Old 524 rewritten 532 Old 521 rewritten 533 Same as old 525 with small addition 534 Same...
527

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الصفحة 9 - that every particle of matter in the universe attracts every other particle, with a force whose direction is that of the line joining the two, and whose magnitude is directly as the product of their masses, and inversely as the square of their distances from each other.
الصفحة 9 - Newton generalized the law of attraction into a statement that every particle of matter in the universe attracts every other particle with a force which varies directly as the product of their masses and inversely as the square of the distance between them; and he thence deduced the law of attraction for spherical shells of constant density.
الصفحة 478 - I infer that the general climate cannot be sensibly affected by conducted heat, at any time more than 10,000 years after the commencement of superficial solidification. No doubt, however, in particular places there might be an elevation of temperature by thermal springs, or by eruptions of melted lava, and everywhere vegetation would, for the first...
الصفحة 460 - On the whole we may fairly conclude that, whilst there is some evidence of a tidal yielding of the earth's mass, that yielding is certainly small, and that the effective rigidity is at least as great as that of steel.
الصفحة 479 - Do not the vast masses of basalt, the general appearances of mountain ranges, the violent distortions and fractures of strata, the great prevalence of metamorphic action (which must have taken place at depths of not many miles if so much), all agree in demonstrating that the rate of increase of temperature downwards must have been much more rapid, and in rendering it probable that volcanic energy, earthquake shocks, and every kind of so-called Plutonic action, have been, on the whole, more abundantly...
الصفحة 216 - A body is called homogeneous when any two equal, similar parts of it, with corresponding lines parallel and turned towards the same parts, are undistinguishable from one another by any difference in quality.
الصفحة 478 - Such is, on the whole, the most probable representation of the earth's present temperature, at depths of from 100 feet, where the annual variations cease to be sensible, to 100 miles ; below which the whole mass, or all, except a nucleus cool from the beginning, is (whether liquid or solid) probably at, or very nearly at, the proper melting temperature for the pressure at each depth.
الصفحة 485 - It is thus shown that, although mechanical energy is indestructible, there is a universal tendency to its dissipation, which produces gradual augmentation and diffusion of heat, cessation of motion, and exhaustion of potential energy through the material universe.2 The result would inevitably be a state of universal rest and death, if the universe were finite and left to obey existing laws.
الصفحة 471 - ... the substances, combining together, may be again separated electrolytically by thermo-electric currents, due to the heat generated by their combination, and thus the chemical action and its heat continued in an endless cycle, violates the principles of natural philosophy in exactly the same manner, and to the same degree, as to believe that a clock constructed with a self-winding movement may fulfil the expectations of its ingenious inventor by going for ever.
الصفحة 492 - HEAT. The sun being, for reasons referred to above, assumed to be an incandescent liquid now losing heat, the question naturally occurs, How did this heat originate ? It is certain that it cannot have existed in the sun through an infinity of past...

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