Reliques of ancient English poetry, by T. Percy, ed. by J. V. Prichard, المجلد 1

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الصفحات المحددة

المحتوى

An original Ballad by Chaucer
252
The Turnament of Tottenham
254
For the Victory at Agincourt
264
The Notbrowne Mayd
265
A Balet by the Earl Rivers
278
Cupids Assault By Lord Vaux
279
Sir Aldingar
282
The Gaberlunzie man Scottish By K James V
289
On Thomas Lord Cromwell
292
Harpalus An ancient English Pastoral
294
Robin and Makyne An ancient Scottish Pastoral
298
Gentle Herdsman tell to me
302
K EdwaTd IV and the Tanner of Tamworth
305
As ye came from the Holy Land
312
Hardyknute A Scottish Fragment By Sir J Bruce
314
A Ballad of Luther the Pope a Cardinal and a Husbandman
327
John Anderson my Jo A Scottish Song
332
Little John Nobody
333
Q Elizabeths Verses while Prisoner at Woodstock
336
The Heir of Linne
337
Gascoignes Praise of the Fair Bridges afterwards Lady Sandes
344
Fair Rosamond By Thomas Delone
347
Queen Eleanors Confession
356
The Sturdy Rock
359
The Beggars Daughter of BednalCreen
360
An Essay on the word Fit and the ancient Balladsinging
368
Fancy and Desire By the Earl of Oxford
371
Sir Andrew Barton
373
Lady Anne Bothwells Lament A Scottish Song
384
The Murder of the King of Scots
387
A Sonnet by Q Elizabeth
388
The K of Scots and Andrew Browne Bv W Elderton
390
The Bonny Earl of Murray A Scottish Song
395
Young Waters A Scottish Ballad
396
Mary Ambree
399
Brave Lord Willoughby
402
Victorious Men of Earth By James Shirley
405
The Winning of Cales
406
The Spanish Ladys Love
409
Argentile and Curan By W Warner
412
Corins Fate
422
Jane Shore
423
Corydons doleful Knell
432

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عبارات ومصطلحات مألوفة

مقاطع مشهورة

الصفحة 432 - Full fathom five thy father lies; Of his bones are coral made; Those are pearls that were his eyes: Nothing of him that doth fade, But doth suffer a sea-change Into something rich and strange. Sea-nymphs hourly ring his knell : Hark! now I hear them, — ding-dong, bell.
الصفحة 193 - Some men with swords may reap the field, And plant fresh laurels where they kill: But their strong nerves at last must yield; They tame but one another still: Early or late They stoop to fate, And must give up their murmuring breath, When they, pale captives, creep to death. The garlands wither on your brow, Then boast no more your mighty deeds; Upon Death's purple altar now See, where the victor-victim bleeds: Your heads must come To the cold tomb; Only the actions of the just Smell sweet, and blossom...
الصفحة 159 - Come live with me, and be my love. And we will some new pleasures prove Of golden sands, and crystal brooks, With silken lines, and silver hooks.
الصفحة 160 - Thy gowns, thy shoes, thy beds of roses, Thy cap, thy kirtle, and thy posies, Soon break, soon wither, soon forgotten, In folly ripe, in reason rotten.
الصفحة 160 - A belt of straw and ivy buds With coral clasps and amber studs : And if these pleasures may thee move, Come live with me and be my Love.
الصفحة 173 - Crabbed age and youth Cannot live together ; Youth is full of pleasance, Age is full of care: Youth like summer morn, Age like winter weather ; Youth like summer brave, Age like winter bare. Youth is full of sport, Age's breath is short, Youth is nimble, age is lame : Youth is hot and bold, Age is weak and cold ; Youth is wild, and age is tame.
الصفحة 208 - Content I live, this is my stay; I seek no more than may suffice; I press to bear no haughty sway; Look, what I lack my mind supplies. Lo, thus I triumph like a king, Content with that my mind doth bring.

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