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TROUND FOR TOLERANCE. — Whenever we cease to

hate, to despise, and to persecute those who think

differently from ourselves, whenever we look on them calmly, we find among them men of pure hearts and unbiassed judgments, who, reasoning on the same data with ourselves, have arrived at different conclusions on the subject of the spiritual world.—Sismondi.

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them to obtain the victory of wit and contradiction, and sometimes for lucre and profession : but seldom sincerely to give a true account of their gift of reason for the benefit and use of man, as if there were sought in knowledge a couch whereupon to rest a searching and restless spirit, or a terrace for a wandering and variable mind to walk up and down with a fair prospect, or a tower of state for a proud mind to raise itself upon, or a fort or commanding ground for strife and contention, or a shop for profit and sale, and not a rich storehouse for the glory of the Creator and the relief of man's estate.Bacon.

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The Middle and Lower Classes. — The middle and

lower ranks, too numerous to be bribed by a minis

ter, and almost out of reach of court corruption, constitute the best bulwarks of liberty. They are a natural and most efficacious check on the strides of power. They ought, therefore, to know their consequence, and to preserve it with unshrinking vigilance. They have a stake, as it is called, a most important stake, in the country; let not the overgrown rich only pretend to have a stake in the country, and claim from it an exclusive privilege to regard its concerns. The middle ranks have their native freedom to preserve ; their birthright to protect from the dangerous attacks of enormous and overbearing affluence. Inasmuch as liberty and security are more conducive to happiness than excessive riches, it must be allowed that the poor man's stake in the country is as great as the rich man's. If he should lose this stake, his poverty, which was consoled by the consciousness of his liberty and security, becomes an evil infinitely aggravated. He has nothing left to defend him “from the oppressor's wrong, and the proud man's contumely.” He may soon degenerate to a beast of burden; for the mind sinks with the slavery of the condition. But while a man feels that he is free, and fills a respectable rank, as a freeman in the community, he walks with upright port, conscious, even in rags, of comparative dignity.— Knox.

B

il 11

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XII.

R o w.— Now is the constant syllable ticking from the

clock of time. Now is the watchword of the wise.

Now is on the banner of the prudent. Let us keep this little word always in our minds, and whenever any thing presents itself to us in the shape of work, whether mental or physical, we should do it with all our might, remembering that Now is the only time for us—that Now is ours; that Then may never be. - Anon.

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Aseness or NOBLENESS OF THE LITERARY CHARACTER. | – Authorship is, according to the spirit in which it

is pursued, an infamy, a pastime, a day labour, a handicraft, an art, a science, a virtue.— Schlegel.

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Excellences of Knowledge.—There are in know

ledge these two excellences : first, that it offers to

every man, the most selfish and the most exalted, his peculiar inducement to good. It says to the former, “ Serve mankind, and you serve yourself;" to the latter, “ In choosing the best means to secure your own happiness, you will have the sublime inducement of promoting the happiness of mankind.” The second excellence of knowledge is that even the selfish man, when he has begun to love virtue from little motives, loses the motive as he increases the love, and at last worships the Deity where before he only coveted the gold upon the altar.—Bulwer.

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DUCATION.—On this subject, as most others, strange

notions have been entertained in the world—that His nothing in a mind is better than any thing; or, that if something must be there, that something is better supplied by chance than by design, as if fortune were wisdom's surest. guide. But “nothing” will not keep its hold in any mind. Be it as it may with space, nature endures no vacuum in minds. The mind is a field, in which, so sure as a nian sows

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