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TOPHAM BEAUCLERK, ESQ. TO THE EARL OF

CHARLEMONT.

Adelphi, Nov. 20, 1773. I DELAYED writing to you, as I had flattered myself that I should have been able to have paid you a visit at Dublin before this time, but I have been prevented, not by my own negligence and indolence, but by various matters.— I am rejoiced to find by your letter that Lady C. is as you wish. I have yet remaining so much benevolence towards mankind, as to wish that there may be a son of yours, educated by you, as a specimen of what mankind ought to be. Goldsmith the other day put a paragraph into the newspapers in praise of Lord Mayor Townshend. The same night we happened to sit next to Lord Shelburne, at Drury Lane; I mentioned the circumstance of the paragraph to him ; he said to Goldsmith that he hoped that he mentioned nothing about Malagrida in it? “ Do you know,” answered Goldsmith, “ that I never could conceive the reason why they call you Malagrida, for Malagrida was a very good sort of a man. You see plainly what he meant to say, but that happy turn of expression is peculiar to himself. Mr. Walpole says that this is a picture of Goldsmith's whole life.--Johnson has been confined for some weeks in the Isle of Sky; we hear that he was obliged to swim over to the main land, taking hold of a cow's tail. Be that as it may, Lady Di, * has promised to make

MY DEAR LORD,

* Lady Diana Beauclerk, wife to Mr. Beauclerk, and daughter to Charles, late Duke of Marlborongh; eminent for her exquisite taste and skill in painting.

a drawing of it. Our poor club is in a miserable decay ; unless you come and relieve it, it will certainly expire. Would you imagine that Sir Joshua Reynolds is extremely anxious to be a member of Almack's? You see what noble ambition will make a man attempt. That den is not yet opened, consequently I have not been there; so, for the present, I am clear upon that score. I suppose your confounded Irish politics take up your whole attention at present. If they could but have obtained the absentee tax, the Irish parliament would have been perfect. They would have voted themselves out of parliament, and lessened their estates one half of the value. This is patriotism with a vengeance.--I have heard nothing of your peacock's eggs. The Duke of N- -d tells me, that if they are put into tallow, or butter, they will never hatch. I mention this to you, as worthy of your notice. Mr. Walpole promised me to send you a drawing of his frames, but he has been so much engaged with Lord Orford's affairs, that he has probably forgot it. There is nothing now at present in the literary world. Mr. Jones *, of our club, is going to publish an account, in Latin, of the eastern poetry, with extracts translated verbatim in verse. I will order Elmsly to send it to you, when it comes out; I fancy it will be a very pretty book. Goldsmith has written a prologue for Mrs. Yates, which she spoke this evening before the opera. It is very good. You will see it soon in all the newspapers, otherwise I would send it to you. I hope to hear in your next letter, that you have fixed your time for returning to England. We cannot do without you. If you do not come here, I will bring all the club over to Ireland, to live with you, and that will drive you here in your own defence. Johnson shall spoil your books, Goldsmith pull your flowers, and Boswell talk to you: stay then, if you can. Adieu, my dear Lord. Pray make my best compliments to Lady Charlemont. Believe me to be very sincerely and affectionately yours,

* Sir William Jones,

T. BEAUCLERK.

TOPHAM BEAUCLERK, ESQ. TO THE EARL OF

CHARLEMONT.

MY DEAR LORD,

Adelphi, December 24, 1773. ENCLOSED I send you the drawing of Mr. Walpole's frames; which I did not receive till last night. I hope you received a letter from me some time ago; I mention this that I may not appear worse than I am, and likewise to hint to you that, when you receive this, you will be two letters in my debt. I hope your parliament has finished all its absurdities, and that you will be at leisure to come over here to attend your club; where you will do much more good than all the patriots in the world ever did to any body, viz. you will make very many of your friends extremely happy; and you know Goldsmith has informed us that no form of government ever contributed either to the happiness or misery of any one.--I saw a letter from Foote, with an account of an Irish tragedy, the subject is Manlius, and the last speech which he makes when he is pushed off from the Tarpeian rock, is “ Sweet Jesus, where am I going ?" Pray send me word if it is true. We have a new comedy here, which is good for nothing ; bad as it is, however, it succeeds very well, and has almost killed Goldsmith with envy.

I have no news, either literary or political, to send you. Every body except myself, and about a million of vul. gars, are in the country. I am closely confined, as Lady Di. expects to be so every hour. my dear lord, very sincerely and affectionately yours,

I am,

T. BEAUCLERK.

TOPHAM BEAUCLERK, ESQ. TO THE EARL OF

CHARLEMONT.

Adelphi, February 12, 1774. I HAVE this moment received your letter, and I need not tell you how happy it has made me, that Lady Charlemont is well, and yourself so much better. I can now give you a better reason for not writing sooner to you, than for any other thing that I ever did in my life. When Sir Charles Bingham* came from Ireland, I, as you may easily imagine, immediately inquired after you; he told me that you were very well, but in great affliction, having just lost your child. You cannot conceive how I was shocked with this news ; not only by considering what you suffered on this occasion, but recollected that a foolish letter of mine, laughing at your Irish politics, would arrive just at that point of time. A bad joke at any time is a bad thing; but when any attempt at pleasantry happens at a moment that a person is in great affliction, it certainly is the most odious thing in the world. I could not write to you to comfort you ; you will not wonder therefore that I did not write at all. I must now entreat you to lay aside your politics for some time, and to consider that the taking care of your health is one of the most public spirited things that you can possibly do; for, notwithstanding your vapour about Ireland, I do not believe that you can very well spare one honest man.-Our politicians, on this side of the water, are all asleep; but I hear they are to be awakened next Monday, by a printer, who is ordered to attend the bar of the house, for having abused Sir Fletcher Norton. They have already passed a vote that Sir Fletcher's character is immaculate, and will most certainly punish the printer very severely, if a trifling circumstance does not prevent them, viz. that the printer should, as he most probably will, refuse to attend.–Our club has dwindled away to nothing. Nobody attends but Mr. Chambers, and he is going to the East Indies. Sir Joshua and Goldsmith have got into such a round of pleasures that they have no time. In my next I will send you a long history of all our friends, and particularly an account how twelve thousand pounds may be paid without advancing one single shilling. This is certainly

MY DEAR LORD,

* The late Lord Lucan. He was a member of the Literary Club.

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