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She, whom my restless gratitude has sought
So long in vain ? O, heavens! the very same,
The soften'd image of my noble friend;
Alive his every look, his every feature,
More elegantly touch'd. Sweeter than Spring! 120
Thou sole surviving blossom from the root
That nourish'd up my fortune! say, ah, where,
In what sequester'd desert hast thou drawn
The kindest aspect of delighted Heaven ?
Into such beauty spread, and blown so fair; 125
Though Poverty's cold wind, and crushing rain,
Beat keen and heavy on thy tender years ?
O let me now into a richer soil
Transplant thee safe! where vernal suns and showers
Diffuse their warmest, largest influence; 130
And of my garden be the pride and joy!
It ill befits thee, O! it ill befits
Acasto's daughter, his, whose open stores,
Though vast, were little to his ampler heart,
The father of a country, thus to pick
The very refuse of those harvest-fields,
Which from his bounteous friendship I enjoy.
Then throw that shameful pittance from thy hand,
But ill applied to such a rugged task;
The fields, the master, all, my fair, are thine; 140
If to the various blessings which thy house
Has on me lavish'd, thou wilt add that bliss,
That dearest bliss, the power of blessing thee !"

Here ceased the youth : yet still his speaking eye
Express'd the sacred triumph of his soul, 145
With conscious virtue, gratitude, and love,
Above the vulgar joy divinely raised.

135

Which scarce the firm philosopher can scorn,
Should his heart own a gleaner in the field;
And thus in secret to his soul he sigh'd:

“What pity, that so delicate a form,
By beauty kindled, where enlivening sense
And more than vulgar goodness seem to dwell,
Should be devoted to the rude embrace

90
Of some indecent clown! She looks, methinks,
Of old Acasto’s line; and to my mind
Recalls that patron of my happy life,
From whom my liberal fortune took its rise;
Now to the dust gone down; his houses, lands, 95
And once fair-spreading family, dissolved.
'T is said that in some lone obscure retreat,
Urged by remembrance sad, and decent pride,
Far from those scenes which knew their better days,
His aged widow and his daughter live,

100 Whom yet my fruitless search could never find. Romantic wish! would this the daughter were !”

When, strict inquiring, from herself he found She was the same, the daughter of his friend, Of bountiful Acasto; who can speak

105 The mingled passions that surprised his heart, And through his nerves in shivering transport ran? Then blazed his smother'd flame, avow'd and bold; And as he view'd her, ardent, o’er and o'er, Love, gratitude, and pity, wept at once. 110 Confused and frighten'd at his sudden tears, Her rising beauties flush'd a higher bloom, As thus Palemon, passionate and just, Pour'd out the pious rapture of his soul:

“And art thou then Acasto's dear remains ? 115 130

She, whom my restless gratitude has sought
So long in vain ? O, heavens! the very same,
The soften'd image of my noble friend;
Alive his every look, his every feature,
More elegantly touch'd. Sweeter than Spring! 120
Thou sole surviving blossom from the root
That nourish'd up my fortune! say, ah, where,
In what sequester'd desert hast thou drawn
The kindest aspect of delighted Heaven?
Into such beauty spread, and blown so fair; 125
Though Poverty's cold wind, and crushing rain,
Beat keen and heavy on thy tender years ?
O let me now into a richer soil
Transplant thee safe! where vernal suns and showers
Diffuse their warmest, largest influence;
And of my garden be the pride and joy!
It ill befits thee, O! it ill befits
Acasto's daughter, his, whose open stores,
Though vast, were little to his ampler heart,
The father of a country, thus to pick

135
The very refuse of those harvest-fields,
Which from his bounteous friendship I enjoy.
Then throw that shameful pittance from thy hand,
But ill applied to such a rugged task;
The fields, the master, all, my fair, are thine; 140
If to the various blessings which thy house
Has on me lavish'd, thou wilt add that bliss,
That dearest bliss, the power of blessing thee !"

Here ceased the youth : yet still his speaking eye Express'd the sacred triumph of his soul,

145 With conscious virtue, gratitude, and love, Above the vulgar joy divinely raised.

Nor waited he reply. Won by the charm
Of goodness irresistible, and all
In sweet disorder lost, she blush'd consent. 150
The news immediate to her mother brought,
While pierced with anxious thought, she pined away
The lonely moments for Lavinia's fate.
Amazed, and scarce believing what she heard,
Joy seized her wither'd veins, and one bright gleam 155
Of setting life shone on her evening hours:
Not less enraptured than the happy pair;
Who flourish'd long in tender bliss, and rear'd
A numerous offspring, lovely like themselves,
And good, the grace of all the country round. 160

THOMSON.

ADAM'S MORNING HYMN. THESE are thy glorious works, Parent of good, Almighty! Thine this universal frame, Thus wondrous fair; Thyself how wondrous then! Unspeakable, who sitt'st above these heavens To us invisible, or dimly seen In these thy lowest works; yet these declare Thy goodness beyond thought, and power divine. Speak, ye who best can tell, ye sons of light, Angels; for ye behold him, and with songs And choral symphonies, day without night, Circle his throne rejoicing; ye in Heaven. On Earth join all ye Creatures to extol Him first, him last, him midst, and without end. Fairest of Stars, last in the train of night, If better thou belong not to the dawn,

15

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Sure pledge of day, that crown'st the smiling morn
With thy bright circlet, praise him in thy sphere,
While day arises, that sweet hour of prime.
Thou Sun, of this great world both eye and soul,
Acknowledge him thy greater; sound his praise 20
In thy eternal course, both when thou climb'st,
And when high noon hast gain'd, and when thou fall'st.
Moon, that now meet'st the orient sun, now fliest,
With the fix'd Stars, fix'd in their orb that flies:
And ye five other wandering Fires, that move
In mystic dance not without song, resound
Alis praise who out of darkness call'd up light.
Air, and ye Elements, the eldest birth
Of Nature's womb, that in quaternion run
Perpetual circle, multiform; and mix

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And nourish all things; let your ceaseless change
Vary to our Great Maker still new praise.
Ye Mists and Exhalations that now rise
From hill or steaming lake, dusky or gray,
Till the sun paint your fleecy skirts with gold, 35
In honour to the world's Great Author rise;
Whether to deck with clouds the uncolour'd sky,
Or wet the thirsty earth with falling showers,
Rising or falling still advance his praise.
His praise, ye Winds, that from four quarters blow, 40
Breathe soft or loud; and wave your tops, ye Pines,
With every plant, in sign of worship, wave.
Fountains, and ye that warble, as ye flow,
Melodious murmurs, warbling tune his praise.
Join voices, all ye living Souls: Ye Birds, 45
That singing up to Heaven-gate ascend,
Bear on your wings and in your notes his praise.

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