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to ride without horses, our ancestors would have given as much credit to the prediction as they gave to Gulliver's Travels. Yet the prediction would have been true; and they would have perceived that it was not altogether absurd, if they had considered that the country was then raising every year a sum which would have purchased the fee-simple of the revenue of the Plantagenets, ten times what supported the government of Elizabeth, three times what, in the time of Oliver Cromwell, had been thought intolerably oppressive. To almost all men the state of things under which they have been used to live seems to be the necessary state of things. We have heard it said that five per cent. is the natural interest of money, that twelve is the natural number of a jury, that forty shillings is the natural qualification of a county voter. Hence it is that, though in every age everybody knows that up to his own time progressive improvement has been taking place, nobody seems to reckon on any improvement during the next generation. We cannot absolutely prove that those are in error who tell us that society has reached a turning point, that we have seen our best days. But so said all who came before us, and with just as much apparent reason.

6 A million a year will beggar us," said the patriots of 1640. - Two millions a year will grind the country to powder," was the cry in 1660, “ Six millions a year, and a debt of fifty millions!" exclaimed Swift ; "the high allies have been the ruin of us." "A hundred and forty millions of debt!” said Junius ; “ well may we say

that we owe Lord Chatham more than we shall ever pay, if we owe him such a load as this." hundred and forty millions of debt!” cried all the statesmen of 1783 in chorus ; 66 what abilities, or what economy on the part of a minister, can save a country so burdened ?” We know that if, since 1783, no fresh debt had been incurred, the increased resources of the country would have enabled us to defray that debt at which Pitt, Fox, and Burke stood aghast, nay, to defray it over and over again, and that with much lighter taxation than what we have actually borne. On what principle is it that, when we see nothing but improve ment behind us, we are to expect nothing but deterioration before us?

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It is not by the intermeddling of Mr. Southey's idol, the omniscient and omnipotent State, but by the prudence and energy of the people, that England has hitherto been carried forward in civilisation; and it is to the same prudence and the same energy that we now look with comfort and good hope. Our rulers will best promote the improvement of the nation by strictly confining themselves to their own legitimate duties, by leaving capital to find its most lucrative course, commodities their fair price, industry and intelligence their natural reward, idleness and folly their natural punishment, by maintaining peace, by defending proprety, by diminishing the price of law, and by obserying strict economy in every department of the state. Let the Government do this: the People will assuredly do the rest.

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MR. ROBERT MONTGOMERY.

(Edinburgh Review, April 1830.)

The wise men of antiquity loved to convey instruction under the covering of apologue; and though this practice is generally thought childish, we shall make no apology for adopting it on the present occasion. A generation which has bought eleven editions of a poem by Mr. Robert Montgomery may well condescend to listen to a fable of Pilpay.

A pious Brahmin, it is written, made a vow that on a certain day he would sacrifice a sheep, and on the appointed morning he went forth to buy one. There lived in his neighbourhood three rogues who knew of his vow, and laid a scheme for profiting by it. The first met him and said, “Oh Brahmin, wilt thou buy a sheep? I have one fit for sacrifice.” “It is for that very purpose," said the holy man, “that I came forth this day.” Then the impostor opened a bag, and brought out of it an unclean beast, an ugly dog, lame and blind. Thereon the Brahmin cried out, “ Wretch, who touchest things impure, and utterest things untrue, callest thou that cur a sheep ?”

Truly," answered the other, “it is a sheep of the finest fleece, and of the

11. The Omnipresence of the Deity: a Poem. By ROBERT MONTGOMERY. Eleventh Edition. London: 1830.

2. Satan: a Poem. By ROBERT MONTGOMERY. Second Edition. London: 1830.

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sweetest flesh. Oh Brahmin, it will be an offering most acceptable to the gods." "Friend," said the Brahmin, “ either thou or I must be blind.”

Just then one of the accomplices came up.“ Praised be the gods,” said this second rogue, “ that I have been saved the trouble of going to the market for a sheep! This is such a sheep as I wanted. For how much wilt thou sell it?' When the Brahmin heard this, his mind waved to and fro, like one swinging in the air at a holy festival.

Sir,” said he to the new comer, “ take heed what thou dost; this is no sheep, but an unclean cur.” 66 Oh Brahmin," said the new comer, 66 thou art drunk or mad!"

At this time the third confederate drew near. us ask this man,” said the Brahmin, “ what the creature is, and I will stand by what he shall say.” To this the others, agreed ; and the Brahmin called out, “Oh stranger, what dost thou call this beast ?" “ Surely, oh Brahmin," said the knave, “it is a fine sheep.” Then the Brahmin said, “ Surely the gods have taken away my senses ; ” and he asked pardon of him who carried the dog, and bought it for a measure of rice and a pot of ghee, and offered it up to the gods, who, being wroth at this unclean sacrifice, smote him with a sore disease in all his joints.

Thus, or nearly thus, if we remember rightly; runs the story of the Sanscrit Æsop. The moral, like the moral of every fable that is worth the telling, lies on the surface. The writer evidently means to caution 11s against the practices of puffers, a class of people who have more than once talked the public into the most absurd errors, but who surely never played a more curious or a more difficult trick than when they passed Mr. Robert Montgomery off upon the world as a great poet.

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In an age in which there are so few readers that a writer cannot subsist on the sum arising from the sale of his works, no man who has not an independent fortune can devote himself to literary pursuits, unless he is assisted by patronage. In such an age, accordingly, men of letters too often pass their lives in dangling at the heels of the wealthy and powerful; and all the faults which dependence tends to produce, pass into their character. They become the parasites and slaves of the great. It is melancholy to think how many of the highest and most exquisitely formed of human intellects have been condemned to the ignominious labour of disposing the commonplaces of adulation in new forms and brightening them into new splendour. Horace invoking Augustus in the most enthusiastic language of religious veneration, Statius flattering a tyrant, and the minion of a tyrant, for a morsel of bread, Ariosto versifying the whole genealogy of a niggardly patron, Tasso extolling the heroic virtues of the wretched creature who locked him up in a mad-house, these are but a few of the instances which might easily be given of the degradation to which those must submit who, not possessing a competent fortune, are resolved to write when there are scarcely any who read. This evil the progress of the human mind tends to

As a taste for books becomes more and more common, the patronage of individuals becomes less and less necessary. In the middle of the last century a inarked change took place. The tone of literary men, both in this country and in France, became higher and more independent. Pope boasted that he was the one poet " who had "pleased by manly ways;" he derided the soft dedications with which Halifax had been fed. asserted his own superiority over the pensioned Boileau,

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