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Truth of my Misfortune, who has been at
Whitchurch lately, and who intended to see you
soon. I suppose he told you his Errand into
these Parts, a providential Thing for me, and
one of the happiest Revolutions in my Life,
if it succeed, as I hope it will. My Spirits
are quite grown rusty, with long and fruitless
Expectations of Happiness, and no Tools are
fine enough to polith, or, as the Artists say,
to touch them, but yourself or Mr. GRAVES.
I knew nothing of his coming till I saw him,
for which Reason I looked upon him as mi-
raculous Manna cr Food from Heaven,

1

I lament very much that you don't design to be in London. next Winter: I shall be there bot fabout fix Weeks, towards the Middle of it. The Winter we met there, I thought a pleasant one, and enough to encourage a second Meeting in the fame Place-The only Place for Whims, practicable there without Reproach, or falling from that Dignity which ’tis necessary for a Gentleman to maintain in the Country. I should like mightily to indulge my Fancy in lume innocent, private, romantic

Expedir

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Expeditions ; I know not what_But all Things as I said, are possible there.

Mr. Graves tells me you are a great Oeconomist. If so, I hope London will be the richer for it, and you the finer, as Luxury is the Daughter of Industry, and Industry again the Mother of Luxury, each reigning by Turns, and fo the World goes on. If you should go to London this Winter, you'll call at Whitchurch by the Way, and we'll go together, which will prevent any Disappointment. You will always be received here, with Acknowledgment of the Favour you do us; fo say we all, and present our Compliments in one Garland to you, which I beg you will accept, though it is but coarsely put together, and you will oblige

Your sincere Friend,

and most obedient Servant,

A. WhistLER.

Wbitchurch, Sept. 8.

L E T. L E T T E R VIII.

Mr. WHISTLER to W. SHENSTONE, Efq,

Dear Sir,

I

Received your kind Letter, and, in Spite of

the Obligation is entirely on my Side, and you have only, in my Opinion, laid a greater Stress upon it by fo generously disclaiming it. I am resolved to be pleased with every Thing you day or do, and if I were not, you are resolved I fhall. I am very glad you intend me a Visit; but am likewise very sorry, I must beg you to defer it for some Time ; our Family talk of going to Bristol very soon, and as I have no where else to go, must go with them, If it was in my Power to defer the Journey, I would gladly do it, to wait on Mr. Shen, STONE, at Whitchurch; or if I could command the House in their Absence, their Abfence and his Prefence would be to me a double Happiness. But as it is, I must, at present,

be

be without a Pleasure, which I hope will not always thus fly from me; I hope the latEnd of this Summer, and Mr. SHENSTONE, will be both more favourable to me, and if fo, I shall reckon that the Spring of the Year is yet to come; I, who place the Seasons entirely in my own Fancy.

I forgot to tell you in my last, that the Princefs AMELIA did us the Honour of a Visit at Whitcburch, though we were obliged to the Stag for it, who seemed to fly from the Honour fhe designed him, and had not Ambition enough (as Lee says) to meet the Blow half Way, or be pleafed with Death, though in the Royal Presence. It was a terrible Day, and the Princess was wet through ; fhe had rode thirty Miles when I saw her, and she rode thirty Miles after that, which was six o'Clock at Night, in her wet Cloaths, and appeared at the Drawing-Room at St. James's, the next Day, which was a Birth-Day.

The Princess (with Submission be it spoke) gave me no Satisfaction, not through any De. ficiency in her Demeanourbut from the dis

satisfied

LETTERS

. satisfied State of Mind. I could be contented with nothing less than you; and I hope you will be so good, as not to let this Disappointment, which I assure you is a great Disappointment to me, be any Objection to my having the Pleasure of your company another Time. With my Service, which waits on you, I am yours, as much as, I hope, you would have

me, viz.

Your sincere Friend and humble Servant,

A. WHISTLER.

Escuse me, if I desire to be remembered to good Mrs. ARNOLD, whom I look upon to be an Example of the simple Force of moral Beauty.

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