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some poetical pieces in “ Dodsley's Col- ancestors, as soon as time has exposed
Jection,” Mr. Stillingfeet, being some their defects.
what of a humourist in his babits aud ipan-

But, perhaps, no age has had so ners, and a little negligent in his dress, much reason to boast its improveliterally wore grey stockings, from which

ments as the present. Other generacircumstance Admiral Buscawen used, by tions may have felt some degree of way of pleasantry, to call them the Blue

honest pride in contemplating a parStocking Socieiy;" as if to indicate that, when these brilliant friends met, it was

ticular art or science not for the purpose of forming a dressed “ Forin'd by their skill, or foster'd by assembly foreigner of distinction

their care." hearing ihe expression, translated it lite

But universal refinement was raily. “ Bas bleu," by which these meet

served for the present. ings came io he afterward distinguished. Mrs. Hannah More, the excellent au

if we take a view of the manners thor of « Strictures on Female Eouca- and customs of our Ancestors, in their tion, Thoughts on the importance of the pursuiis of either business or pleaMiruners of the Great to general Society, sure, we shall ärid abundant reason and an Estimate of the Religion of the to deplore their ignorance, and confashionable World,” with other pieces,) gratulate ourselves upon the extincwho was herself a distinguished member tion of old-fashioxied, absurdities. I of the Society, has written an admirable would not, however, be thought to poem with the title of the “ Bas bleu," in

blame them for faults which they allusion to this mistake of the foreigner, in which she has characterized most of considered as virtues, or for ignorance the eminent personages of wbich it was

which they could not avoid. I am composed. The concluding part of her

well aware that most of their absurd prefutory memorandum to the poem is so

notions may be traced to their Eduvery apposite to my present purpose, that cation.

What could be expected I cannot resist the temptation of inserting from a woman brought up under their it here,

system? She might, indeed, make « May the Author be permitted to bear what they supposed to be a good her grateful testimony, which will not be

wife or mother, and perhaps, in some suspected of Attery now that most of the instances, prove au useful member of persons named in this poem are gone down

society: but how could she ever atto the grave, to the many pleasant and

tain to that exquisite polish which instructive hour's stie had the honour to pass in this company, in which learning

we juistly esteem the summum bonum was as little disfigured by pedantry, good of Female Education, and which can taste as little tinctured by affectation, and only be acquired at our most fashiongeneral conversation as liitle disgraced by able seminaries : Of these our Ances calumny, levity, and the other censurable tors had no idea. They had not even errors with which it is too commonly French governesses and would, I tainted, as has perhaps been known in fear, have formed very harsh ideas of any society ?' --Works of Mrs. H. More, “ Establishment for Young Lavol. I. p. 12.

dies."--Their young men were equal. Mrs Montagu being left, by the will of ly limited in their advantages. Wben her husband, in possession of his noble

they had been whipped through a fortune, lived in a style of the most splen- public School under the infiuence of did hospitality, till her death, which bap

that detestable, and, I am happy to pened at an advanced age, 25th August, 1800,"

J. B.

add, obsolete maxiin, that “ Learning
is beiter than house or Jand," there

was 'no Four-iu-hard Club to hail
THE TIMES, No. I.

their emancipation, and, extend to Tempora mutantur,et nos mutamur in illis them the right hand of fellowship.

The only driving which they under-
VERY race of men has consider- stood was that of the quill; and the

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itself in some particular or another, quainted was the strong one in the and has looked upon itself as a gene. Back Counting-house. Their amuseration recently emerged from at least ments too were such as might be expartial barbarism. Mankind, fond of pected. They would sit whole hours novelty and aspiring to perfection, to hear the fustian of Shakspeare; have never failed to alter and im- and even in very late times have been prove the modes and customs of their known to laugh with Foote, and smile

with

plete

with Sheridan. What boundless rap That, however, which constituies tures would they feel, could they be the chief glory of the age, and gives revived and placed in the front boxes us a decided superiority over our of our largest theatre, there to be Forefathers, is the total extirpation hold the masterly acting, not of a of the " natural ills that Hesin is heir Macklin or a Garrick, a Foote or a to.”-ho will suffer poverty, when Lewis, but of a troop of living horses!. ten thousand bills beg bis acceptance -not the dry insipid scenes of a regu- of unbounded richies? Who will enlar Comedy, but the inimitable buf- dure disease, when professional men, fooneries of a Pantomime, with the regularly educated, clothed with fascinating embellishments of Danc- certificates, and influenced solely by iag Lobsters and Vegetable Pugilists! philanthropy, crowd around hini, -Sucií a Scene, so novel and so bril- and assure him of a cheap, speedy, liant, would be too much for powers and complete cure by incans of their newly re-acquired, and would iestore invaluable medicines ? Who will bear the antiquated Worthies to their the ravages of old age, when hair, graves, while the last faint echo of teeth, and colour, are su templingły their sepulchral" Encore !” whisper- offered to him ? ed their dirge.

But I think I have said enough to Great also would be the astonish- prove to most of my Readers that ment of our Forefathers, could they the change of system which has of witness the important improvements lale laken place is highly beneticial which have taken place even in our to the Nation. There are, howevir, inferior domestic concerns. I remem some starily veterans of the old ber that when I was a boy (which, School, some so Lainditores lemporis by the bye, is now full 50 years ago) acli,” who may not be so casily conif my good grandmother wished io viuced; and, with a view to their make broth, it used to cost me an conviction, I propose, in some future hour's work in the garden to provide papers, to treat more fully of the her with the necessary ingredieuts: subjects which I have above inerely ‘a labour now perfecily unnecessary, mentioned, together with others when every description of animal and which I have not specified. If, by rcavegetable essence may be had ready son of anything which I may say, onc for adınixture. I am "growing old; elderly geotleman should be induced bal I hope to see the day when our to renounce his antiquated opinions, cheniists shall write over their doors, one seminary should be enlarged, one “ Dinners drest on the shortest no new whip sported, one ticket for the tice;" when a Lord Mayor's fenst next new pantomime be sold, or one may be packed in a medicine chest; box of pills be swallowed, I shall reand a fainily subsist a fortnigbt in a joice to think that I have contributed luxurious style on the contents of an to the happiness of my fellow-creaeight-drop phial, price 10s. 6d. duty tures, and have not lived or written included. The advantages of this in vain. AARON, BICKERSTAFFE. mode of concentration are too multifarious to admit of enumeration, and MR. URBAN,

April 9. too evident to require it.- few, however, of the first which present YO!

TOUR Correspondent, who met

with the name of Cbichester in themselves to iny mind may be just - Pierce Plowman's Visions, would permentioned. By this method, a good haps fiad it satisfactory to be informa, Citizen inay eat at one meal, with the ed, that John Chichester was Lord greatest ease and without the least Mayor of London A.D. 1369, 43 danger of indigestion; six turtles and Edw. III. when John Piel and Hugh four haunches of venison, with an

Holditch were Sheriffs. Chichester ad libitum accompaniment. In case,

was of the Company of Goldsmiths, also, of a siege, how much would it and bore for bisarins: On a field Brmine facilitate the introduction of provi- a sinister canton charged with a gobsions! and in victualling our ships, let and cover.

Civicus. how much room might be saved, when a ton of beef might be stowed

Thomas LEVINGE, Esq. (of Great in a quart bottle! Aod, when tra

Shepey, co. Leicester) died in 1694, æt. velling, we should no longer beat the 68; who iu his early days had been distinmercy of innkeepers, when a com guished as a bold Warrior. Do any tra, plete larder might be conveniently ces of his heroism remain recorded ? carried in a coach-pocket!

MCTEORO

A METEOROLOGICAL JOURNAL, kept at ClArton, in Hackney,

frun the 16th of March to the 15th of April, 1811.
Thermoineter. Barometer.

Hyg.
Wind.

Weather, &c. Mouth. Max. Min. Max. Min.

Day of

రంటందన : : 20 cm

Apr. 1

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Mar. 16 53

30:31 30.25 0.9 S, S. E. ipar
17 57
S0.17 30:17

N.--. clear 18

40 30:15 30.15 0.0 N.SE. air 19 43 30.23 30:20 1-7

S. W.

Ja few clouds 20 55 50 30:15 30:07 1.14 s. W. clously 21 60 45 30-05 30.05 ():18 S. W. rain and clouds 22 45 34 30:38 30:13 0:16 N. ciondy-clear 23

30:30 30:48 below O N-S-Filciear 24 54 S9 30-40 30.28 •10 N-S. E. clear 25 50 39 30-21 30 11

N-S. E.clear 26

37 30 24 30.10 0:3 N-S. E.clear 27 54 33 S0:45 S0.23

NS E. clear 28 61 40 30 60 30:48 .15 W--N-E.clear 29 57 45 30.61 30.55 .6

N-, clear 30 60

SW'-NE clear 31 49 43 30.22 30:16 .2 N. E. cloudy 51 39 S0.10 30:00

•3

E.-S. E cloudy--fair
2 62
29.98 29.90

ES clear and clouds
3 60 49 30.04 29.98

w.n.w.-N. clear and clouds 58 39 30.15 30.09

N.-S. E clear and clouds 30.18

0 E. N. E. clouded 6 55

Var. clear aud clouds 43 30 09:55 09:52 2

N. snowing---wmdy 8 39 30 29 62 29.59

N.-N.E.Icloudy and snowing 9 46 31

29.79
29.67

N. clear & clouds--clear
10 51 35 29.90 29.85 • 12 N. E.-S. clear-shorers
11 50 34 30.22

30 03 7

small rain-clear
12 50 44 30.23 30.12 0.1 S.-W. \fair~-rain and wind
13

65 51 30:15 30-00 1.9 S. W. rain--fair
66
30:20

0:1 W. faire-showers
15 66

W. (clear and clouds

OBSERVATIONS. March 18. This evening Cirri becoming Cirro-strati observed. De Luc's electric bells

quite silent 19. Cirro-Cumulus and gentle showers. Electric bells ring weak, but regularly. 20 21 & 22. During this period mill winds and damper air prevailed. Electrie bells

pulsated pretty regularly : on the erening of the, 2200. fieccy evanescent

Cumuli indicated clear weather. The electric belís became silent at night. 23. Cloudy; fine purple and yellow coloured Sun-set. Bells silent. 24. Very clear; only faint streaks of the Cirrus Linearis. 25. Early I observed Cirrus, ramifying about in all directions, and becoming

Cirro-stratus and Cirro-cumulus : fleedk Cumuli floated in the wind be.

neath them. Belis silent. 27. Cirrus prevailed this evening, and became the Cirro-stratus Myoides, co.

loured by the setting Suu. Bells begin to ring agaiu. 28 & 29. Cirrus and Cirru-stratus. Bells ring irregularly, or at intervals. April 1. A Meteor seen to S. W. about 9 P. M. 2 & 3 Cirro-stratus and Cirro-cumulus alternately prevail. 4. This afternoon fleecy, rocky, and mountainous Cumuli; in a higher region

Cirro-stratus and Cirro-cumulus in different places, the latter most abun. dant during the day, but the foriner ultimately prevailed, and at night

exhibited a Lunar Habo, of the usual diameter, i.e. between 10° and 50°, 6. Cirro-cumulus in the evening.

7. Cirro-stratus seemed to have the Iris colours, &c. at Sun-set. .& 10. Cirrus, Cirro-cumulus, Cirro-stratus, avd Cumulus, secn.

11, Small rain, paly Cumuli afterwards,
13. Cirrus, Cirro-cumulus, Cirro-stratus, &c.

15. Tufts of Cirrus in the evening.
N. B. From the 24th March the electric bells rang irregularly till about the 14th
April, when they rang regularly and loud till the 18th, when they ceased, and have pot
Clapton, April 19, 1811.·

THOMAS FORSTERS

taug since.

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