Letters by Historicus on Some Questions of International Law: Reprinted from 'The Times' with Considerable Additions

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Macmillan and Company, 1863 - 212 من الصفحات
 

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الصفحة 129 - But there is nothing in our laws, or in the law of nations, that forbids our citizens from sending armed vessels, as well as munitions of war, to foreign ports for sale. It is a commercial adventure which no nation is bound to prohibit, and which only exposes the persons engaged in it to the penalty of confiscation.
الصفحة 132 - In pursuance of this policy, the laws of the United States do not forbid their, citizens to sell to either of the belligerent Powers articles contraband of war, or to take munitions of war or soldiers on board their private ships for transportation; and although, in so doing, the individual citizen exposes his property or person to some of the hazards of war, his acts do not involve any breach of national neutrality, nor of themselves implicate the Government.
الصفحة 129 - It is a general understanding, -grounded on true principles, that the powers at war may seize and confiscate all contraband goods, without any complaint on the part of the neutral merchant, and without any imputation of a breach of neutrality in the neutral sovereign himself, (c) It was contended, on the part of the French nation, in 1796...
الصفحة 116 - November in that year; the effect of a notification to any foreign government would clearly be to include all the individuals of that nation ; it would be the most nugatory thing in the world, if individuals were allowed to plead their ignorance of it; it is the duty of foreign governments to communicate the information to their subjects, whose interests they are bound to protect. I shall hold therefore that a neutral master can never be heard to aver against a notification of blockade, that he is...

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