Physic and physicians: a medical sketch book, exhibiting the public and private life of the most celebrated medical men, of former days; with memoirs of eminent living London physicians and surgeons, المجلد 1

الغلاف الأمامي
Longman, Orme, Brown, 1839
 

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الصفحة 139 - Full little knowest thou, that hast not tried, What hell it is in suing long to bide ; To lose good days that might be better spent ; To waste long nights in pensive discontent; To speed to-day, to be put back to-morrow ; To feed on hope ; to pine with fear and sorrow ; To have thy Prince's grace, yet want her peers...
الصفحة 262 - Homer ruled as his demesne; Yet did I never breathe its pure serene Till I heard Chapman speak out loud and bold: Then felt I like some watcher of the skies When a new planet swims into his ken; Or like stout Cortez when with eagle eyes He stared at the Pacific — and all his men Look'd at each other with a wild surmise — Silent, upon a peak in Darien.
الصفحة 263 - Pipe to the spirit ditties of no tone: Fair youth, beneath the trees, thou canst not leave Thy song, nor ever can those trees be bare; Bold Lover, never, never canst thou kiss, Though winning near the goal — yet, do not grieve; She cannot fade, though thou hast not thy bliss, For ever wilt thou love, and she be fair!
الصفحة iii - A physician in a great city seems to be the mere plaything of fortune; his degree of reputation is, for the most part, totally casual — they that employ him know not his excellence; they that reject him know not his deficience. By any acute observer who had looked on the transactions of the medical world for half a century a very curious book might be written on the "Fortune of Physicians.
الصفحة 65 - For physic and farces his equal there scarce is— His farces are physic, his physic a farce is.
الصفحة 26 - Why no, Sir. Every body knows you are paid for affecting warmth for your client; and it is, therefore, properly no dissimulation: the moment you come from the bar you resume your usual behaviour. Sir, a man will no more carry the artifice of the bar into the common intercourse of society, than a man who is paid for tumbling upon his hands will continue to tumble upon his hands when he should walk on his feet.
الصفحة 88 - said the Doctor, 'do you pretend to be paid for such a piece of work ? Why, you have spoiled my pavement, and then covered it over with earth, to hide your bad work ! ' ' Doctor ! ' said the paviour, ' mine is not the only bad work the earth hides.
الصفحة 359 - Others for Language all their care express, And value books, as women men, for dress: Their praise is still, — The style is excellent; The sense, they humbly take upon content.
الصفحة 277 - Fret not thyself, thou glittering child of pride. That a poor villager inspires my strain; With thee let Pageantry and Power abide: The gentle Muses haunt the sylvan reign; Where through wild groves at eve the lonely swain...
الصفحة 20 - Whether what Temple says be true, that physicians have had more learning than the other faculties, I will not stay to inquire ; but, I believe, every man has found in physicians great liberality and dignity of sentiment, very prompt effusion of beneficence and willingness to exert a lucrative art where there is no hope of lucre.

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