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pressed by himself. “He that will write well in any tongue, must speak as the common people do, think as wise men do; as so should every man understand him, and the judgment of wise men allow him.”

This tutor of queens wrote a work he called The Schoolmaster. It is a fine treatise on education, and contains all the elements which are found in the mo

dern treatises upon that subject. He was for uniting.

the Gymnasia, the Lyceum, and the cademy together;
only he did not name the workshop. as Pellendoff and
others have since done. in systems of education. It is
said, by one of his o scham became a
Protestant through the medium of Greek literature. He
was an admirer of Sir Thomas More and followed his
example in bringing out his wo
guage. He was one of the formesoterary cha-
racter of the reign of Elizabeth, she having been known
as a scholar of his, previous to her com othe throne.
He was born in 1515, and lived ten y -
of Elizabeth. --o

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wrote the lives, or rather the accounts of the Martyrs.

This has been held in great veneration by the Protes

tants of England and this country ever since; but it is
more the subject than the power of the historian that
interests us, in reading his gloomy history. He was,
however, a very accurate scholar in the learned lan-
guages, and wrote very good English.
Many good prose-writers were at this time to be
found in England. Hollingshed, Sir Philip Sidney,

whose name we have before mentioned, and Raleigh,

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were fine writers; the two latter, politicians, soldiers,

and men of the world. Selby, Cecil, Stow, Knolles,

and Agard, wrote works of fancy and history, and were great benefactors to the nation. But we must not pass

over so hastily the works of Richard Hooker. The great work of this distinguished scholar and sound divine was his Ecclesiastical Polity. He wrote many other works; but this has come to us, a fine argument, and one that towards settling the disputes on se days. The work is read inity who wish to make y. Like Butler's Analogy, of a to date, this work is found in the hands of the young o wyers, as they are marking

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whi oessional on should be master of He handled so great power and effect, yet he has been honored and respected by the most enlightened - them ever since. They acknowledged

the style of Hooker's works to have been superior to anything in o e before Bacon's works appeared: It is perspicuous forcible, elevated, and manly. The mind'of Hookéo was rich in thoughts, original and acquired, and his soul was evidently in his works. It is, in my opinion, a model for modern writers; and evident traces of Hooker's influences may be found in the style of Chatham, Burke, and other statesmen. It is almost impossible to speak of Shakspeare, without falling into some errors of taste, feeling, or criticism, nor do we expect entirely to shun them. He was truly the poet of nature. He was born a few years before Elizabeth came to the throne of England. He was a sprightly country lad when first known, who had excited some attention by his talent at versifying. In some wild frolic, he trespassed on the huntinggrounds of a rich neighbor. This indiscretion was followed up by a lampoon on the same gentleman. There was much scurrility in his satire, at that time, but no 6f his plays in print at his death; nor were his plays collected until seven years after this period. During the whole of the seventeenth century there were but four editions of his plays printed. He was admired by the court in the reign of James, and Charles the first and second. Our ancestors, particularly the puritans who came to this country, did not favor the drama in any shape o but engaged themselves to put down all th - othough, in Christian days, these go by the appendages of religious

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great proofs of genius. The subject of the verse was indignant, and threatening venge - pung Shakspeare fled to London, and pro ectly to the theatre, for he had a ownsopoards, and

perhaps a relation. story of
at the door of the theatr
the lovers of the dramata o seats is all done away
with by the late commentaries upon his woks: These
were the gossipings of his early also who oved
the marvellous changes in the destino men. The
probability is that he took some small employment in
the business of the stage, until his talents as a dramatic
writer became in some measure developed. He was
born 1564, was eighteen years of age, or more, when
he went to London, ". five years, some say seven,
he was distinguished dramatic writer; so that his
progress must have been rapid. The queen was fond

of plays, but the dramatic writers of a previous age.

had been wretched, and anything that bore the marks of nature, or genius, was, in the nascent growth of the stage, readily discovered, and acknowledged. He lived easily, that is, comfortably, and on acquiring a competency, retired to his native village, satisfied with what he had done; but heaven did not suffer him long to enjoy his well earned ease, for he died on his birthday, April 23, 1616, aged 52. There were but eleven

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institutio o early or quite a century had elapsed oo death of Shakspeare, before we

find a quotation fremo works in any American author; and stronge as it on ly seem, in about half a century after Shakspeare's death, we hear the great John Dryden go saying, that Shakspeare was growing

obsolete. Ao: then did not feel what we do, that the pyramids will crumble to the dust, and the Nile be dry, and the Ethiop change his skin, and the leopard his spots, before Shakspeare will grow obsolete with us. He looked on man, and at once became master of the inmost recesses of his soul, as it were by intuition. He saw the defects of character sat once, as well as the brighter parts; and all the advantages, as well as the absurdities of customs and laws, he struck off as though each one had been the study of his life. There is no variety of character in the lists of men, that he did not portray at full length, or give its semblance by profile, glance, or shadow. Sometimes he painted with care, and at other times he traced with a hurried, but unerring hand. The Dramatic Muse brought him to the great fountain of her inspirations, and as he bent to

quaff the waters, he saw all the natural, moral, politi

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. . . .46 cal, and intellectual world, reflected in the pure mirror, which attracted his vision; aye, and other worlds beyond this, were there also—for he “exhausted worlds, and then imagined new.” The English language was at that time copious, and rich, but not precisely fixed; nor was the philosophy of its etymology very distinctly understood. Shakspeare was, classically speaking, an uneducated man, for he had not been allowed nk of the sweet fountains of ancient lo ed at a period when much of this literature bee, * into English, by learned men. He had devoured all the tales, romances, legends, and novels that were to be found in English ; nor did his reading stopthere; he was also deeply read in such histories as were then extant, and he particularly studied biography. He isseldom wrong in an incident, act, or a matter of fact. He sometimes takes liberties with both, but he clearly shows you that he is master of both. When Shakspeare was a schoolboy, the press had been teeming with vernacular literature—either original productions or translations—for a century, and he had the advantage of all this. These works were sufficient to set him to thinking and writing, and his mind was free from all shackles. He knew nothing of the kogic of the schoolmen, nor was he bound to regard their rules. He was indebted to no Alma Mater for nursing him in learning. Shakspeare took his words from the common people, that is from all classes in the busy scenes of life, and from those books written for popular reading. He had but little assistance from dictionaries, for but few had turned their attention to the making of dictiona

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ries, nor could this be expected, while a language was

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