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slightly to the West, narrowing into a deep gorge between the ridge of Ophel and the Mount of Offence, which is that continuation of Mount Olivet in whose rocky side is excavated the village of Siloam. South of this, the contracted valley again opens into a small plain, formed by the concurrence of two other valleys, which we must next trace up to their commencement. The more marked and better known of these is the Valley Ben-Hinnom, which following a serpentine course from this quarter, encircles the City on the South and West, where it expands into a plain around the Birket Mamilla. The third Valley between the two just described, (it must at present be anonymous) runs in a northerly direction through the City, and opens into a small plain without the Damascus Gate. In the mouth of this valley the Pool of Siloam is situated. The southern part of the ridge between the Valley of Jehoshaphat and the intermediate valley, is universally allowed to be the Temple Mount, and the southern part of the broader ridge, between the latter valley and that of Hinnom, is generally conceded to be the Hill of Sion. To proceed now with the walls. From the N. E. angle of the City, nearly to the Damascus Gate (2200 feet) the course of the northern wall is almost due West; then verging some points to the South, over a high rocky ridge, it reaches the brow of the Valley BenHinnom, at the N.W. angle of the City, 1990 feet from the Damascus Gate. Hence, taking a south-easterly direction from the Valley Ben-Hinnom, 878 feet to the Jaffa Gate; then due South to the S.W. angle, (1400 feet) it bisects Mount Sion from West to East, and continues in an irregular line, with the same general continued with one or two angles to the Gate of St Mary, Eastward; and Westward, past the Franciscan Convent, to the North-West corner of the City. The Western part of this, as far as St Stephen's Street, is “the Street of the Holy Sepulchre; ” the Eastern is now “the Via Dolorosa".” From the Damascus Gate another main street diverges from St Stephen's Street, until it meets the Via Dolorosa at a large ruined Bath, then, running parallel to the Western wall of the Haram, traverses the whole length of the valley, which has been noticed as intersecting the City, as far as the Street of the Temple. It here meets with an obstruction, the cause of which will be presently explained, but is thence continued, in the same Southerly course, to the small closed gate, marked in modern plans as the Dung Gate”. This is “the Street of the Valley of the Mills;” but it will be more convenient to designate it “the Valley Street,” and the Valley, “the Mill Valley.” With these data, we shall be in some measure prepared to enter upon the disquisition of the topography of the ancient City; but as I am first to address myself to that part of the subject which affects the authority of the Holy Sepulchre, a somewhat more minute description of its site, and of the Christian quarter in which it is situated, will be desirable. continued with one or two angles to the Gate Mary, Eastward; and Westward, past the Frai Convent, to the North-West corner of the City. Western part of this, as far as St Stephen's Str “the Street of the Holy Sepulchre; ” the East now “the Via Dolorosal.” From the Damascus another main street diverges from St Stephen's until it meets the Via Dolorosa at a large Bath, then, running parallel to the Western wall Haram, traverses the whole length of the valley, has been noticed as intersecting the City, as far Street of the Temple. It here meets with an oh tion, the cause of which will be presently expl but is thence continued, in the same Southerly c to the small closed gate, marked in modern pl the Dung Gate”. This is “the Street of the Wa the Mills;” but it will be more convenient to nate it “the Valley Street,” and the Valley, Mill Valley.” With these data, we shall be in some measur pared to enter upon the disquisition of the topog of the ancient City; but as I am first to address to that part of the subject which affects the aut of the Holy Sepulchre, a somewhat more minut

no way connected with this gate, but with the old St Stephen's, now the

* It may be well to state that the Via Dolorosa is called by the French

writer, la rue de Josaphat, and the
Eastern gate la porte de Josaphat.
This gate is commonly known to tra-
vellers as St Stephen's gate, but I call
it by its native name, St Mary's Gate,
to prevent confusion, as I have to speak
of a street of St Stephen, which is in

Damascus Gate.
* “La posterne de la Tanerie” of
the French description. The Arabic
alone names the street, but carries it
only to the Street of the Temple: the
French description reckons it all one
street to the gate, as indeed it is.

scription of its site, and of the Christian quart which it is situated, will be desirable.

* It may be well to state that the no way connected with this g Via Dolorosa is called by the French with the old St Stephen's, writer, a rue de Josaphat, and the Damascus Gate. Eastern gate la porte de Josephut. * “la posterne de la Tan This gate is commonly known to tra- the French description. The vellets as St Stephen's gate, but I call alone names the street, but c it by its native name, St Mary's Gate, only to the Street of the Ter: to prevent confusion, as I have to speak French descriptive reckons it of a street of St Stephen, which is in street to the saw, as also to

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