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Upon the whole there cannot be a doubt but that a Book, like this, purposely compiled for the of young persons of both sexes, singularly various in its subjects, containing selections from writ whose characters are established without controversy, abounding with entertainment and useful formation, inculcating the purest principles of morality and religion, and displaying excellent mod of style and language, must effectually contribute to the improvement of the rising generation in kno ledge, taste, and virtue. The Public have, indeed, already felt, and acknowledged its utility, by least fallible proof, their general reception of it. It has been adopted in all the most respecta places of education, and has scattered, far and wide, the seeds of excellence, which may one d arrive at maturity, and add to the happiness both of the community and of human nature.

What English book similar to this volume, calculated entirely for the use of young students schools, and under private tuition, was to be found in the days of our fathers ? None, certain The consequence was, that the English part of education (to many the most important part) w defective even in-places most celebrated for classic discipline; and boys were often enabled to re: Latin perfectly, and write it tolerably, who, from the disuse or the want of models for practice, we wretchedly qualified to do either in their native language. From this unhappy circumstanc classical education was brought into some degree of disgrace; and preposterous it certainly was, study, during many of the best years of life, foreign and dead languages, with the most scrupulou accuracy, and at the same time entirely to neglect that mother tongue, which is in daily and hour! requisition; to be well read in Tully, and a total stranger to Addison ; to have Homer and Horac by heart, and to know little more than the names of Milton and Pope.

Classical learning, thus defective in a point so obvious to detection, incurred the imputation pedantry. It was observed to assume an important air of superiority, without displaying, to the common observer, any just pretensions to it. It even appeared with marks of inferiority, when brought into occasional collision with well-informed understandings, cultivated by English literature alone, but greatly proficient in the school of experience. Persons who had never extended their views to ancient and classic lore, but had been confined in their education to English, triumphed, in the common intercourse of society, over the academical scholar; and learning often hid her head in confusion, when pointed at, as pedantry, by the finger of a loquacious dunce.

It became highly expedient therefore to introduce mone or ENGLISH READING into our classical schools; that those who went out into the world with their coffers richly stored with the golden medals of antiquity, might at the same time be furnished with a sufficiency of current coin from the modern mint, for the commerce of ordinary life; but there was no school-book, copious and various enough, entirely calculated for this purpose. The Grecian and Roman History, the Spectators, and Plutarch's Lives, were indeed sometimes introduced, and certainly with great advantage. But still, an uniformity of English books, in schools, was a desideratum. It was desirable that all the students of the same class, provided with copies of the same book, containing the proper variety, might be enabled to read it together; and thus benefit each other by an emulous study of the same subject or composition, at the same time, and under the eye of their common master.

For this important purpose, the large collections, entitled ELEGANT EXTRACTS,” both in Prose and Verse, and the Volume of LETTERs, from the best English Writers, under the title of “ ELEGANT Epistles,” were projected. Their reception is the fullest testimony in favour both of the design and its execution.

This whole Set of EXTRACTS, though now reduced for the purpose of rendering it more convenient in its size, is yet more copious and valuable in its materials, than any other publication of the same kind, and certainly must conduce, in a very high degree, to that great national object, the public instruction of the middle and higher orders of society, to promote which was the primary, and indeed the sole object of the original Compiler.

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Sect.
Authors. Pag. | Sect.

Authors. Pag.
THE Vision of Mirza Spectator. 1 46 Advantages of a Place of Education Seed. 49

2 Voyage of Life ; an Allegory Ramb. 3 47 Lost Opportunities cannot be re-

3 Journey of a Day; Story of Obidah 5

called

Tottie. 50

4 Preseni Life conducive to the Happiness 48 Beginnings of Evil to be resisted Blair. 51

of a future one

Spect. 7| 49 Order to be observed in Amuse-

5 Advantages of a good Education

ments

51

6 Disadvantages of a bad Education Ramb. 950 to be preserved in your Society 51

ī Omniscience, &c. of the Deity

Spect. 11 51

necessary in Business, Time, &c. 52

8 Motives to Piety and Virtue

13 52 Idleness avoided by observing

52

9 On the Immortality of the Soul

15 | 53

essential to Self-enjoyment, &c. 52

10 Duty of Children to their parents 16 54 Suppression of criminal Thoughts

53

11 Strength of Parental Affection

17 | 55 Experience anticipated by Reflection 53

12 Remarks on the Swiftness of Time Idler. 1956 Beginnings of Passion to be opposed 53

13 Folly of mispending Time Ramb. 20 57 Government of the Temper

54

14 Importance of Time

Spect. 22 58 A peaceable Temper recommended 54

15 Punishment of mispent Time Guard. 24 59 Exertions of a benevolent Temper 55

16 Importance of Time to Youth Chesterf. 26 60 Blessings of a contented Temper

55

17 On a lazy and trifling Disposition

26 61 Usefulness of a Desire of Praise

56

18 Bad Effects of Indolence Connois. 27 62 Effects of excessive Desire of Praise 56

19 Innocent Pleasures of Childhood Guard. 29 63 Usefulness of virtuous Discipline

57

20 Cheerfulness recommended Spect. 31 64 Consolation of religious Knowledge 57

21 Advantages of a cheerful Temper 33 65 Sense of Right and Wrong, &c. Gregory. 58

22 On Truth and Sincerity

33 66 Religion, Scepticism, &c.

58

23 Rules for the Knowledge of One's Self 35 67 Comforts of Religion

59

24 No Life pleasing to God but that which 68 Advantages of Devotion

60

is useful to Nankind

Adven. 36 69 True and false Politeness

Hurd. 60

25 Providence proved by Animal In-

70 Beauties of the Psalms

Horne. 61

stinct.

Spect. 39 71 Temple of Virtuous Love

Taller. 62

26 Necessity of forming religious Princi-

72

of Lust

63

ples at an early Age,

Blair. 41 73

of Virtue

63

27

of early acquiring virtuous

74

of Vanity

63

Dispositions and Habits

41 | 75 of A varice

64

28 Happiness and Dignity of Manhood 76 Balance of Happiness equal Blair. 65

depend on youthful Conduct

42 77 Caution on seducing Appearances

65

29 Piety to God the Foundation of good

78 Virtue Man's true Interest Harris. 66

Morals

42 79 On Gratitude

Spect. 66

30 Religion never to be treated with Le 80 Religion the foundation of Content Adven. 67

42 81 Bad Company

Gilpin. 70

31 Modesty and Docility joined to Piety 43 82 Religion ihe best and only Support in

32 Sincerity and Truth recommended 43

Cases of real Distress

Sterne. 71

33 Benevolence and Humanity

44 83 On Prodigality

Ramb. 72

34 Courtesy and engaging Manners

44 | 84 On Honour

Guard. 73

35 Temperance in Pleasure recommended 44 85 On Modesty

Spect. 74

36 Whatever violates Nature cannot af 86 On disinterested Friendship Melmoth. 75

ford true Pleasure

45 87 The Art of Happiness

Harris. 77

37 Irregular Pleasures, bad Effects of 45 88 The Choice of Hercules

Tatler. 78

38 Industry and Application in Youth 45 89 On Entrance into Life

Knor. 79

39 Employment of Time

46 90 Wisdom of aiming at Perfection

81

40 Success depends on Heaven's Bless 91 On forming a Taste for simple Plea-

ing

46

83

41 Necessity of an early and close Ap 92 Hints to those, designed for the Life of

plication to Wisdom

Seed. 46

a Gentleman

85

42 Unhappiness of not early improving 93 III Effects of Ridicule

87

the Mind

47 94 Value of an honest Man

90

43 Great Talents not requisite for the 95 A short System of Virtue and Happi.

common Duties of Life

48

92

44 AMuence not to exempt from Study 48 96 An Address to a young Scholar

94

45 Pleasures resulting from a prudent 97 On Goodness of Heart

95

Use of our Faculties

49 | 98 A Letter to a young Nobleman Bolton, 97

vity

CATECHETICAL LECTURES.

NATURAL THEOLOGY,

Sect.

Authors. Pag. Sect.

Authors. Pag.

99 Introduction to the Catechism Gilpin. 101

1 State of the Argument

Paley. 160

100 On the Creed--the Belief of God 103 2

continued

162

101 On the Belief of Jesus Christ

105

3 Application of the Argument

165

102 On the Conception and Birth of

4 The Succession of Plants and Ani.

Christ

107

mals

173

103 On Christ's Ascension---Belief in the

Holy Ghost

111

104 On the Holy Catholic Church

113 132 Scriptures the Rule of Life Chapone. 174

105 On tbe Resurrection of the Body

114 133 Of Genesis

175

106 On the Ten Commandments

116 134 - Exodus

176

107 Worship and Honour of God

118 | 135

Leviticus, Numbers, Deutero-

108 Honour due to God's Word

121

nomy

176

109 Duties owing to particular Persons 122 | 136 - Joshua

177

110 Duty to our Teachers and Instruc-

137 - Judges, Samuel, and Kings

177

tors, &c.

123 138 Chronicles, Ezra, Nehemiah, and

111 Behaviour to Superiors

125

Esther

178

112 Against wronging our Neighbour by

139 -- Job

178

injurious Words

126 | 140 - the Psalms

178

113 Against wronging our Neighbour by

141

Proverbs, Ecclesiastes, Solomon's

injurious Actions

128 Song, Prophecies, A pocrypha

179

114 Duties to ourselves

130 | 142 The New Testament

180

115 On coveting other Men's Goods
132 | 143 – our Saviour's Example, &c.

180

116 Ou the Sacrament of Baptism

134 144 Comparative View of the Blessed

117 On the Sacrament of the Lord's Supper--135 and Cursed

181

118 Expostulation with Unbelievers

145 Character of St. Paul

182

M. Pascal, 137 146 Of the Epistles

183

119 On the Old and New Testament

147

Epistles of St. James

183

Wilkins. 141 148 Epistles of St. Peter, &c. 184

120 To the Sceptics and Infidels of the

149 Revelation

184

Age

Bp. Watson. 143

121 A Prayer or Psalm Lord Bacon. 153

ECONOMY OF HUMAN LIFE.

122 Doctrine of Christ, a Doctrine of

Truth and Simplicity

Dr. Clarke. 153 150 Application

Dodsley. 184

123 Light of Reason imperfect

151 Prudence

185

Lord Lyttleton. 154 152 Temperance

185

124 Simplicity of the Sacred Writers West. 154 153 Pity

186

125 Superiority of Christian Philosophy

154 Desire and Love

186

over Stoical

Miss Carter. 156 155 Woman

187

126 Fine Morality of the Gospel Beattie. 158 156 Son

188

127 Beneficence to the Poor enjoined

157 Brothers

188

by the Gospel

Paley. 158 158 Charity

188

188

128 Simplicity of the Gospel gives it an

159 Religion

Air of Sublimity Mainwaring. 159 160 Death

189

129 Bible, as a curious ancient History,

worthy Attention

Croxall. 159 161 A Morning Prayer for a Young

130 Queen Anne's Prayer

159

Student

Knor, 190

131 Prince Eugene's Prayer

160 | 162 An Evening Prayer

190

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Sect.

Authors. Pag. Sect.

Authors. Pag.

39 Of the Rise of Poetry among the Ro 107 On the Historical Style

Blair. 959

Spence. 210 108 of Herodotus and Thucydides

252

40 - Livius, Nævius, and Ennius

211 | 109 Sallust and Livy

253

41 - Plautus

212 110 Their Use in Style

Felton. 254

42 Terence

212 111 On Spenser and Shakspeare

254

43 - Afranius

213 112 Milton and Philips

255

44 Pacuvius and Actius

213 113 Great Men usually cotemporary Blair. 255

45 the Rise of Satire; of Lucilius,

114 Four Ages' marked out by the learned

- 255

&c.

214 115 Reputation of the Ancients

255

46 the Criticisms of Cicero, &c.

214 116

not owing to Pedantry

255

the flourishing State of Poetry

117 Moderns excel the Ancients

256

among the Romans

215 118 Excellencies of the Ancients and

48 Observations on the Æneid

Moderns

49 Of Horace

217 119 Assiduous Study of the Greek and

50 - Tibullus, Propertius, and Ovid 217 Roman Classics recommended

958
51 Phædrus

218 | 120 Excellencies of the ancient Histo-

52 Manilius

218

rians

258

53 the Poets whose Works have not

121 - Livy

258

come down to us

219 | 122

Tacitus

258

54,- the Fall of Poetry among the Ro-

123 On the Beauty of Epistolary Writing 259

219 124 Carelessness to be avoided

259

55 Lucan

220 125 On Pliny's Letters

259

56 His Description of a Sea-fight

220 196 - Cicero's

260

57 Of Persius

221 127 - Pope's and Swift's.

260

58 - Silius, Statias, and Val. Flaccus 221 128 On the Letters of Balzac, Voiture, &c. 260

59 - Martial

222 129 Pindar the Father of Lyric Poetry 261

60 - Juvenal

223 130 On Horace as a Lyric Poet

261

61 On the Literary Character of Julius 131 – Casimir, and other modern Lyric

Cæsar

Knox. 223

Poets

261

62 On the Character and Style of Pliny

- Politian and Muretus

Knox. 262

the Younger

225 138 -- Philelphus and Theodore Gaza 263

63 The Introduction, &c. of Arts at 134 the different Kinds of Poetical

Rome

Spence. 227

Composition in the Sacred Books;

64 The Condition of the Romans in the

1st. of the Didactic

Blair. 265

second Punic War

227 135 Of the Elegiac and Pastoral

265

65 Marcellus's Attack on Syracuse 228 | 136 On the Lyric

265

66 Conquests of the Roman Generals 228 137 A Diversity of Style and Manner

67 Introduction into Italy of the Works

in the different Composers of the

of the ancient Artists

230 sacred Books.

68 Decline of the Arts, Eloquence, and

On Job, David, and Isaiah

265

Poetry, on Augustus's Death 231 138 – Jeremiah

966

69 On Demosthenes

Blair. 231 139 - the Book of Job

266

70 Demosthenes imitated Pericles

231 140 - the Iliad of Homer

267

71

contrasted with Eschines 232 141 - the Odyssey of Homer

268

72 On the Style of Demosthenes

232 | 142 the Beauties of Virgil

268

79 Cicero, his Etoquence

233 143 Homer and Virgil compared

268

74
his Defects

233 | 144 On the ancient Writers Blackroall. 969

75 and Demosthenes compared 234 | 145 -Homer

270

76 Means of improving in Eloquence 236 146 - Theocritus

270

77 Industry recommended to a Speaker 236 | 147 - Herodotus

271

78 Attention to the best Models

237 | 148 the Style of Xenophon and Plato Knor 271

79 Caution in choosing Models

297 149 Xenophon's Memoirs of Socrates - 973

80 Style of Bolingbroke and Swift

237 | 150 - the Characters of Theophrastus,&c.-.-275

81 Eloquence requires frequent Exer-

151 - Cicero

Blackwall. 277

237 152 Advantages enjoyed by the Classics 277

82 Use of Critical and Rhetorical Wri-

153 Thoughts on the @dipus Tyrannus

ters

298 of Sophocles

Knox. 279

83 Use of the original ancient Writers 238 154 Remarks on Minor Greek Poets 280

84 Necessity of a Classical Education Felton. 299 159 Morals of the Classics Blackwall. 285

85 On the Entrance to Knowledge

239 160 On the Morality of Juvenal

285

86 The Classics recommended

239 161 Directions for Reading the Classics 286

87 Greek and Roman Writers compared 240 162 The subordinate Classics not to be
88 Commendation of the Latin Tongue 242 neglected

287

89 Directions in reading the Classics 242 163 On the Study of the New Testament 287

90 Commendation of Schools

243 164 The old Critics to be studied

288

91 On forming a Style

244 165 Rise of Philosophical Criticism Harris. 289

92 Expression suited to the Thought 244 166 Greek Authors of Ditto

289

93 On Embellishments of Style

244 167 On some Passages in Aristotle's

94 · Mastery of Language

245

Rhetoric

Knor. 290

95 the Purity and Idiom of Language 245 168 Roman Authors of Philosophical

96 - Plainness and Perspicuity

246

Criticism

Harris. 291

97 - the Decoration, &c. of Style

246 169 Greek and Roman Historical Critics

291

98 Metaphors and Similitudes

247 170 Modern Philosophical and Histo-

99 Metaphors

247

rical Critics

292

100 - Epithets

248 171 Lexicon and Dictionary Compilers,

101 - Allegories

948

and Grammarians

992

102 the Sublime

248 172 Modern Critics, Writers, &c.

293

103 Rules of Order and Proportion 249 173 On Translators

293
104 A Recapitulation
250 114 Rise of Corrective Criticism

298
105 How to form a right Taste
251 175 Criticism of Use to Literature

294
106 Taste to be improved by Imitation 252 | 176 The Epic Writers come first

205

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Sect.

Authors. Pag. Sect.

Authors. Paga

177 Chance produces no Literary Ex-

205 Character of the English, Oriental,

cellence

Harris. 295 Latin, and Greek Languages Harris. 309

178 Causes or Reasons of such Excel-

206 History, &c. of the Middle Age 311

lence

296 207 Account of the Destruction of the

179 Why Contraries have this Effect 296

311

180 Advice to a Beginner in Criticism 297 208 A thens, an historical

Account of

312

181 On Numerous Composition

297 209

Synesius’s subsequent Ac-

182 On other Decorations of Prose; as

count of

315

Alliteration

298 210 Anecdote of the Modern Greeks 316

183 The Period

299 211 On the different Modes of History 316

184 Monosyllables

299 212 Universal Ideas of Natural Beauty 916

185 Authorities alleged

300 213 Character of the Man of Business

186 Objections answered

300

often united with that of the

187 Habit makes Practice easy

300 Scholar and Philosopher

318

188 The Constituent Parts of every

214 Progressions of Art disgustful, the

Whole merit our Regard

300 Completion beautiful

319

169 Verbal Decorations not Minutiæ 301 215 On Conversation

Usher. 320

190 Advice to Readers
301 216 Ou Music

321

191 Constituent Parts of a Whole, ex-

217 On Sculpture and Painting

emplified in Virgil's Georgics 301 218 On Architecture

324
192 And in the Menexenus of Plato 303 219 Thoughts on Colours and Light

324
193 On the Theory of Whole and Parts 303 220 On Uniformity

324

194

Accuracy

304 221 On Novelty

325

195 Diction

304 222 Origin of our general Ideas of Beauty 325

196 the Metaphor

304 223 Sense, Taste, and Genius distinguished 326

197 What Metaphors the best

305 224 Thoughts on the Human Capacity 328

198 On Enigmas and Puns

306 225 Taste, how depraved and lost

328

199 Rules defended

306 226 Some Reflections on the Human Mind 328

200 Fallacy of the Sufficiency of Genius 306 227 General Reflections on Good Taste

201 No Genius without Rules

307

Rollin. 329

202 Rules did always exist

307 298 Dr. Johnson's Preface to his Edi-

203 Connexion between Rules and Genius 308

tion of Shakspeare

Johnson. 334

204 Difficulty in knowing how to like 308 229 Pope's Preface to his Homer

Pope. 347

BOOK III. Orations, Characters, and Letters.

FIRST Oration against Philip Leland. 359 32 Speeches on the Functions of Ju-

Oration against Cataline Whitworth. 366 ries in Cases of Libel.

3 Oration for Archias

973 Mr. Fox's Speech

411

4 Oration of Pericles

Thucyd. 379 33 MR. ERSKINE's Speech on the same

5 Romulus to the Romans

Hooke. 383 subject

420

6 Hannibal to Scipio Africanus

383 34 MR. SHERIDAN's Speech upon the

7 Scipio's Answer

384 Begum Charge

422

8 Speech of Seneca to Nero Corn. Tacit. 384 35 MR. GRATTAN's Speech on the De-

9

Charidernus

Q. Curt. 385 claration of Right

424

10 Callisthenes's Reproof of Cleon

385 36

11 Brutus vindicates Cæsar's Murder Shak. 386 claration of Right being carried

12 Caius Marius to the Romans Sallust. 386 37

on the Sale

13 Titus Quinctius to the Romans Hooke. 388

of Peerages

430

14 Micipsa to Jugurtha

Sallust. 389 38 MR. CURRAN's Speech in Defence of

15 Publius Scipio to the Rom. Army Hooke. 389 Mr. Hamilton Rowan

432

16 Hannibal to the Carthaginian Army 391 39

in Defence of

17 Scythian Ambas. to Alexander Q. Curt. 392 Mr. Finnerty

433

18 Junius Brutus over Lucretia Livy. 393 40 Character of Marius

Middleton. 434

19 Adherbal to the Roman Senate Sallust. 393 41

Sylla

435

20 Canuleius to the Roman Consuls Hooke. 395 12

Pompey

436

21 Speech on reducing the Army Pulteney. 396 43

Julius Cæsar

437

22 for repealing the Septennial

44

Cato

438

Act

Sir John St. Aubin. 398 45 Cæsar and Cato compared Sallust. 438

23 The Minister's Reply to Ditto Walpole. 400 46 Character of Cataline

438

24 Speech on Repeal of the Jew Bill Lytt. 402 47

Hannibal

Livy. 439

25 LORD CHATHAM on Taxing America 404 48 From Middleton's Character of Cicero 439

26

on a charge brought

49 Character of Martin Luther Robertson. 446

against certain Members of the

50

Alfred K. of England Hume. 447

House, as giving birth to Sedition

51 Another

Smollodt. 447

in America

404 52 Character of William the Conqueror

27

on the Bill for quar-

Hume. 448

tering Soldiers in America

405 53 Another

Lingard. 449

28

His Speech for the

54 Character of William Rufus Smollett. 450

immediate removal of the Troops

55 Another

Lingard. 451

from Boston, in America

406 56 Character of Henry I.

Hume, 451

29

on moving an A-

57 Another

Lingard. 451

mendment to the Address

408 58 Character of Stephen

Hume. 453

30

on Lord Suffolk's

59 Another

Smollett. 453

Proposal to employ Indians in 60 Character of Henry

Hume. 453

the War

41061 Another

Smollett. 454

31 MR. BURKE's Conclusion of his

62 Character of Richard I.

Hume. 454

Speech to the Electors of Bristol 411 63 Another

Lingard. 455

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