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out of the town ; but I had scarcely arrived at my own house at Cochin, when the persons who had permitted me to take the manuscipts, came in evident agitation, and told me I must restore them immediately to calm the popular rage. Others had gone to complain to the Chief Magistrate, Thomas Flower, Esq. And now I had lost my spoil, but for the friendly counsel and judicious conduct of Mr. Flower. He directed that all the manuscripts should be delivered up to him, and, that there should be no further proceedings on the subject without his authority. To this the Jews agreed. There was some plea of justice on my side, as it was understood that I had given a valuable consideration. In the mean time he allowed a few days to pass, that the minds of the people might become tranquil, and he then summoned some of the more liberal

men,

and
gave

them hearing on the subject. In the mean time I thought it prudent to retire from Cochin, for a day or two, and went to Cranganor, about sixteen miles off, to Colonel Macaulay, the British Resident at Travancore, who was then at the house of Mr. Drummond, the Collector of Malabar. On my return to Cochin, Mr. Flower informed me that all the manuscripts were to be returned to my house; that I was to select what was old, and of little use to the Jews, and to give back to them what was new. The affair ended, however, in the Jews permitting me generously to retain some part of the new.

I have since made a tour through the towns of the Black Jews in the interior of the country, Tritoor, Paroor, Chenotta, and Maleh. I have procured a good many manuscripts, chiefly in the Rabbinical character, some of

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which the Jews themselves cannot read; and I do not know what to say to their traditions. A copy of the Scriptures belonging to Jews of the East, who might be supposed to have had no communication with Jews in the West, has been long considered a desideratum in Europe ; for the Western Jews have been accused by some learned men of altering or omitting certain words in the Hebrew text, to invalidate the argument of Christians. But Jews in the East, Cremote from the controversy, would have no motive for such corruptions. One or two of the MSS. which I have just procured, will probably be of some service in this respect. One of them is an old copy of the Books of Moses, written on a roll of leather. The skins are sewed together, and the roll is about forty-eight feet in length. It is, in some places, worn out, and the holes have been sewed up with pieces of parchment. Some of the Jews suppose that this roll came originally from Senna, in Arabia ; others have heard that it was brought from Cashmir. The Cabul Jews, who travel into the interior of China, say that in some Synagogues the Law is still written on a roll of leather, made of Goats' skins dyed red; not on vellum, but on a soft flexible leather; which agrees with the description of the roll above mentioned.'*

* Mr. Yeates, formerly of All Souls College, Oxford, and editor of the Hebrew Grammar, has been employed by the author for the last two years, at Cambridge, in arranging and collating the Hebrew and Syriac MSS. brought from India. His collation of the Roll of the Pentateuch above meno tioned, is now finished, and will form a volume in quarto. The University has, with great liberality, resolved that this

* Ever since I came among these people, and heard their sentiments on the prophecies, and their confident hopes of returning to Jerusalem, I have thought much on the means of obtaining a version of the New TESTAMENT in the Hebrew language, and circulating it among them and their brethren in the East. I had heard that there were one or two translations of the Testament in their own possession, but they were studiously kept out of my sight, for a considerable time. At last, however, they were produced by individuals in a private manner. One of them is written in the small Rabbinical or Jerusalem character ; the other in a large square letter. The history of the former is very interesting. The translator, a learned Rabbi, conceived the design of making an accurate version of the New Testament, for the express purpose of confuting it. His style is copious and elegant, like that of a master in the language, and the translation is in general faithful. It does not indeed appear that he wished to pervert the meaning of a single sentence; but depending on his own abilities and renown as a scholar, he hoped to be able to controvert its doctrines, and to triumph over it by fair contest in the presence of the world. There is yet a mystery about the circumstances of this man's death, which time will perhaps unfold : the Jews are not inclined to say much to me about him. His version is complete, and written with greater freedom and ease towards the end than at

book shall be printed at the expence of the University, for the benefit of Mr. Yeates; and Dr. Marsh, the learned Editor of Michaelis, bas written a Note on the antiquity and importance of the manuscript, which will form a Preface to the work.

which the Jews themselves cannot read ; and I do not know what to say to their traditions. A copy of the Scriptures belonging to Jews of the East, who might be supposed to have had no communication with Jews in the West, has been long considered a desideratum in Europe; for the Western Jews have been accused by some learned men of altering or omitting certain words in the Hebrew text, to invalidate the argument of Christians. But Jews in the East, "remote from the controversy, would have no motive for such corruptions. One or two of the MSS. which I have just procured, will probably be of some service in this respect. One of them is an old copy of the Books of Moses, written on a roll of leather. The skins are sewed together, and the roll is about forty-eight feet in length. It is, in some places, worn out, and the holes have been sewed up with pieces of parchment. Some of the Jews suppose that this roll came originally from Senna, in Arabia ; others have heard that it was brought from Cashmir. The Cabul Jews, who travel into the interior of China, say that in some Synagogues the Law is still written on a toll of leather, made of Goats' skins dyed red; not on vellum, but on a soft flexible leather; which agrees with the description of the roll above mentioned.'*

* Mr. Yeates, formerly of All Souls College, Oxford, and editor of the Hebrew Grammar, has been employed by the author for the last two years, at Cambridge, in arranging and collating the Hebrew and Syriac MSS. brought from India. His collation of the Roll of the Pentateuch above mentioned, is now finished, and will form a volume in quarto. The University has, with great liberality, resolved that this

* Ever since I came among these people, and heard their sentiments on the prophecies, and their confident hopes of returning to Jerusalem, I have thought much on the means of obtaining a version of the New TESTAMENT in the Hebrew language, and circulating it among them and their brethren in the East. I had heard that there were

one or two translations of the Testament in their own possession, but they were studiously kept out of my sight, for a considerable time. At last, however, they were produced by individuals in a private man

One of them is written in the small Rabbinical or Jerusalem character ; the other in a large square letter. The history of the former is very interesting. The translator, a learned Rabbi, conceived the design of making an accurate version of the New Testament, for the express purpose of confuting it. His style is copious and elegant, like that of a master in the language, and the translation is in general faithful. It does not indeed appear that he wished to pervert the meaning of a single sentence; but depending on his own abilities and renown as a scholar, he hoped to be able to controvert its doctrines, and to triumph over it by fair contest in the presence of the world. There is yet a mystery about the circumstances of this man's death, which time will perhaps unfold : the Jews are not inclined to say much to me about him. His version is complete, and written with greater freedom and ease towards the end than at

ner.

book shall be printed at the expence of the University, for the benefit of Mr. Yeates; and Dr. Marsh, the learned Editor of Michaelis, has written a Note on the antiquity and importance of the manuscript, which will form a Preface to the work.

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