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No sun — no moon !

No morn— no noon -
No dawn — no dusk - no proper time of day-

No sky - no earthly view

No distance looking blue -
No road — no street — no “t' other side the way" -

No end to any Row -
No indications where the Crescents go -

No top to any steeple -
No recognitions of familiar people -

No courtesies for showing 'em

No knowing 'em!
No travelling at all — no locomotion,
No inkling of the way — no notion

“No go" — by land or ocean -
No mail - no post-

No news from any foreign coast -
No park — no ring — no afternoon gentility -

No company — no nobility -
No warmth, no cheerfulness, no healthful ease,

No comfortable feel in any member –
No shade, no shine, no butterflies, no bees,
No fruits, no flowers, no leaves, no birds,

November!

ON

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But now I often wish the night
Had borne my breath away!

I remember, I remember
The roses red and white,
The violets, and the lily-cups,
Those flowers made of light !
The lilacs where the robin built,
And where my brother set
The laburnum on his birth-day,-
The tree is living yet!

I remember, I remember
Where I was used to swing,
And thought the air must rush as fresh
To swallows on the wing;
My spirit flew in feathers then,
That is so heavy now,
And summer pools could hardly cool
The fever on my brow !

I remember, I remember
The fir-trees dark and high;
I used to think their slender tops
Were close against the sky:
It was a childish ignorance,
But now 't is little joy
To know I'm further off from heaven
Than when I was a boy.

FAIR INES.
O saw ye not fair Ines ?
She's gone into the west,
To dazzle when the sun is down,
And rob the world of rest :
She took our daylight with her,
The smiles that we love best,
With morning blushes on her cheek,
And pearls upon her breast.

O turn again, fair Ines,
Before the fall of night,
For fear the moon should shine alone,
And stars unrivalled bright;

And blessed will the lover be
That walks beneath their light,
And breathes the love against thy cheek
I dare not even write !
Would I had been, fair Ines,
That gallant cavalier,
Who rode so gayly by thy side,
And whispered thee so near! -
Were there no bonny daines at home,
Or no true lovers here,
That he should cross the seas to win
The dearest of the dear?

I saw thee, lovely Ines,
Descend along the shore,
With bands of noble gentlemen,
And banners waved before :
And gentle youth and maidens gay,
And snowy plumes they wore; —
It would have been a beauteous dream,
- If it had been no more !

Alas, alas ! fair Ines,
She went away with song,
With music waiting on her steps,
And shoutings of the throng;
But some were sad, and felt no mirth,
But only music's wrong,
In sounds that sang farewell, farewell,
To her you've loved so long.
Farewell, farewell, fair Ines !
That vessel never bore
So fair a lady on its deck,
Nor danced so light before, -
Alas for pleasure on the sea,
And sorrow on the shore !
The smile that blest one lover's heart
Has broken many more!

A PARENTAL ODE TO MY SON, AGED THREE YEARS AND

FIVE MONTHS.
Thou happy, happy elf !
(But stop, — first let me kiss away that tear) -

Thou tiny image of myself!

(My love, he's poking peas into his ear!)

Thou merry, laughing sprite!

With spirits feather-light, Untouched by sorrow, and unsoiled by sin (Good heavens! the child is swallowing a pin!)

Thou little tricksy Puck! With antic toys so funnily bestuck, Light as the singing bird that wings the air (The door! the door! he'll tumble down the stair !)

Thou darling of thy sire!
(Why, Jane, he'll set his pinafore afire !)

Thou imp of mirth and joy!
In Love's dear chain so strong and bright a link,
Thou idol of thy parents – (Drat the boy!

There goes my ink!)

Thou cherub— but of earth;
Fit playfellow for Fays, by moonlight pale,

In harmless sport and mirth,
(That dog will bite him if he pulls its tail !)

Thou human humming-bee, extracting honey From every blossom in the world that blows,

Singing in youth's elysium ever sunny, (Another tumble ! -- that's his precious nose !)

Thy father's pride and hope ! (He'll break the mirror with that skipping-rope !) With pure heart newly stamped from Nature's mint(Where did he learn that squint ?)

Thou young domestic dove !
(He'll have that jug off, with another shove !)

Dear nursling of the Hymeneal nest!
(Are those torn clothes his best?)

Little epitome of man! (He'll climb upon the table, that's his plan!) Touched with the beauteous tints of dawning life

(He's got a knife!)

Thou enviable being !
No storms, n clouds, in thy blue sky foreseeing,

Play on, play on,

My elfin John! Toss the light ball — bestride the stick (I knew so many cakes would make him sick!)

With fancies, buoyant as the thistle-down, Prompting the face grotesque, and antic brisk,

With many a lamb-like frisk, (He's got the scissors, snipping at your gown!)

Thou pretty opening rose ! (Go to your mother, child, and wipe your nose !) Balmy and breathing music like the South, (He really brings my heart into my mouth!) Fresh as the morn, and brilliant as its star,(I wish that window had an iron bar!) Bold as the hawk, yet gentle as the dove,

(I'll tell you what, my love, I cannot write unless he's sent above !)

STANZAS.
FAREWELL, life! my senses swim,
And the world is growing dim:
Thronging shadows cloud the night,
Like the advent of the night
Colder, colder, colder still,
Upward steals a vapor chill;
Strong the earthy odor grows —
I smell the mould above the rose !

Welcome, life! the spirit strives !
Strength returns and hope revives;
Cloudy fears and shapes forlorn
Fly like shadows at the morn-
O'er the earth there comes a bloom;
Sunny light for sullen gloom,
Warın perfume for vapor cold -
I smell the rose above the mould!

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