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theria cases. The mortality of these forty-three cases was less than 10 per cent. I have it to say that in handling these cases I succeeded in keeping the schools going, for you know in the country the first thing done when a case of diphtheria or scarlet fever occurs in the community is to close the schools.

I made fifty free vaccinations, had reported five cases of typhoid fever and three cases of tuberculosis. This report does not attempt to include anything like the number of cases occurring in this county. It seems hard to get physicians to report their cases of typhoid and tuberculosis. It is gratifying to report that, after a seven-years' siege of smallpox, I had but one case since my last annual report, for which I am thankful.

As you know, the State Board of Health, at its July meeting in this city, ordered the railroads entering our city from the South to provide detention hospitals for the care of any person who might chance to come into our city suffering with yellow fever. These hospitals were located in the counties adjacent to the city limits. Being in the county, of course the Jefferson county board had jurisdiction. It is with pleasure that I have it to say that we were fortunate indeed in not having a single case of yellow fever to care for.

I report 127 nuisance notices served and same number abated. In October, the State board's attention was called to the prevalence of glanders among the horses of Jefferson county, and, in keeping with your instructions, your proclamation, provided in card form to the number of one hundred were placed in the hands of the county patrolmen in Jefferson county, with instructions from the State Veterinarian and myself to shut off the water supply from the public drinking troughs located in the county and the troughs to be filled up with unslaked lime. After ten days' time, I had the reports from the county patrolmen that the instructions had been carried out to the letter. I desire to thank Dr. Eisenman for his courteous treatment tendered me in helping abate glanders.

At the May meeting of the Jefferson County Board of Health, the health oficer was instructed to proceed against any and all dairymen in the county selling milk from cows fed upon swill slop. In company with Dr. Albert Deig, of the city health office, we succeeded in getting nine indictments against as many men at the hands of the May grand jury. I have been informed recently by the clerk of the circuit court that these indictments went down and out on a demurrer during the October term. I regret very much that we were not able to enforce the law against these violators, but it seems that it is extremely difficult to get an indictment to stick for this special offense.

I began in June, and continued through July and August and a portion of September, the spread of crude oil upon the stagnant pools

done by this board. There is no question in my mind but that it pre

and ponds in the county near the city limits.

In all,

2,100

gallons

were used. This, in my opinion, is one of the most valuable things vents a great deal of sickness, besides ridding people of the mosquito

nuisance.

I desire to tender the thanks of the board, individually, as well as my own, to the Hon. J. P. Gregory, county judge, together with the eight excellent gentlemen who compose the fiscal court, for their many prompt replies for requests at the hands of this board, and many other little courtesies extended the county health officer. I Gesire to thank Capt. Cowles for his many little courtesies extended in connection with his official position as clerk of the fiscal court. 1 desire to thank Dr. Griffiths, Dr. Allen and Dr. Baker for their kind treatment to me as secretary of this board, and lastly, I am indebted to the State Board of Health, together with its honorable secretary, for little kindnesses and the promptness with which my business communications have been handled.

All of which I respectfully submit to your board for your annual report. I am,

Very respectfully,

B. W. SMOCK, M. D., Secretary.

Jessamine County Board of Health,

Nicholasville, Ky., August 31, 1905. To the State Board of Health:

Since our last published report two years ago, there have been two outbreaks of smallpox in this county, in the High Bridge and Nicholasville districts, with a total of sixteen cases and no deaths.

The first case came from Mercer county, Ky., and 150 persons had been exposed to the disease before its character was recognized and reported so that we could ake steps to bring it under control. Of those exposed, 100 had been properly vaccinated; of these, four 'contracted the disease and none died. Of the fifty exposed who had not been vaccinated, twelve took the disease and none died.

The population of this county is 12,000. At the time of our last report, 9,000 had been vaccinated. Since that time it is estimated that 500 have procured vaccination, leaving 20 per cent. still unprotected, after nearly eight years of smallpox almost constantly in some section of the State.

We have no eruptive hospital. Our method of managing the disease was to quarantine the cases at their homes in the county. Cases

occurring in the city were removed to a temporary pest house in the country, two miles from town, where they were treated in tents.

The total cost of managing the disease for the two years, including hospital, physicians, vaccination, guards, nurses, food and medicine, has been $1,250. The estimated cost in loss of trade and interference with business has been very little.

The chief difficulties in stamping out the disease have been failure to diagnose and report cases, and the interference of a few meddlesome laymen.

As nearly as can be ascertained, other cases of preventable diseases have occurred during the two years as follows: Consumption, fifty cases and twenty deaths; typhoid fever, thirty-five cases and four deaths; diphtheria, few cases and no deaths; scarlet fever, thirty cases and no deaths. The average cost to our people for managing and treating a case of any of these diseases, including medical attention, nursing, loss of time and incidental expenses, is estimated to he $40, making a total loss to the county for the two years from diseases which might be prevented of $14,000, as against $28,420 paid for county, and $28,420 for State taxes. The county health officer is paid an annual salary of $250, and all the other members serve gratuitously.

Very respectfully,

J. A. VAN ARSDALL, M, D., Secretary.

Johnson County Board of Health.

Paintsville, Ky., August 31, 1905. To the State Board of Health:

Since our last published report two years ago, there have been outbreaks of smallpox in this county, in the First precinct, with a total of five cases and no deaths.

The first case came from a poorly disinfected house, and no persons had been exposed to the disease before its character was recog. nized and reported so that we could take steps to bring it under control. Of those exposed none had been properly vaccinated; of these, five contracted the disease and none died.

The population of this county is 15,000. At the time of our last report 10,000 had been vaccinated. Since that time it is estimated that 500 have procured vaccination, leaving 33 per cent. still unprotected, after nearly eight years of smallpox almost constantly in some section of the State.

We have no eruptive hospital.

The total cost of managing the disease for the two years, including hospital, physicians, vaccination, guards, nurses, food and medicine, has been $75. The estimated cost in loss of trade and interference with business has been none.

The chief difficulty in stamping out the disease has been its mildness.

Very respectfully,

I. R. TURNER, M. D., Secretary.

Kenton County Board of Health.

Covington, Ky., August 31, 1905. To the State Board of Health:

Since our last published report two years ago, there have been two outbreaks of smallpox in this county, with a total of fifty-eight cases and no deaths.

We have two eruptive hospitals, located two miles from Covington, with a capacity for 150 patients. Our method of managing the disease was immediately removing patient to hospital and vaccinating all those exposed to the disease or any one found that could not produce a good scar under five-years' standing. Infected persons received treatment at hospital.

The total cost of managing the disease for the two years, including hospital, physicians, vaccination, guards, nurses, food and medicine, has been $2,000. The estimated cost in loss of trade anil interference with business has been very small.

The chief difficulties in stamping out the disease have been its mildness and cases found not reported to proper officers early.

As nearly as can be ascertained, other cases of preventable diseases have occurred during the two years as follows: Consumption, 200 cases and 200 deaths; typhoid fever, 200 cases and forty deaths; diphtheria, 125 cases and twenty-five deaths; scarlet fever, 250 cases and ten deaths; cholera infantum, fifty cases and thirty deaths; dysentery, sixty cases and twenty deaths. The county health officer is paid a salary of $100, and all of the other members serve gratuitously.

Very respectfully,
R. LEE BIRD, M. D., Secretary Kenton County Board.
H. F. WILSON, Health Officer City of Covington.

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Hindman, Ky., August 31, 1905. To the State Board of Health:

Since our last published report two years ago there has been no outbreak of smallpox in this county.

The population of this county is 10,000. At the time of our last report, 300 had been vaccinated. Since that time it is estimated thai 400 have procured vaccination, leaving 93 per cent. still unprotected, after nearly eight years of smallpox almost constantly in some section of the State. We have no eruptive hospital.

As nearly as can be ascertained, other cases of preventable diseases have occurred during the two years as follows: Consumption thirty-five cases and twelve deaths; typhoid fever, fifty-three cases and four deaths; cholera infantum, twenty-four cases and one death; dysentery, sixty-four cases and three deaths. The average cost to our people for managing and treating a case of any of these diseases, including medical attention, nursing, loss of time and incidental expenses, is estimated to be $35, making a total loss to the county for the two years from diseases which might be prevented of $6,160, as against $8,800 paid for State taxes. The county health officer is paid no salary.

Very respectfully,

J. M. DUKE, M. D., Secretary.

Knox County Board of Health. (No report received.)

Larue County Board of Health, (No report received.)

Laurel County Board of Health.

London, Ky., August 31, 1905. To the State Board of Health:

Since our last published report two years ago, there have been two outbreaks of smallpox in this county, with a total of 125 cases and no deaths.

The first case came from about Jellico, Tenn., and many persons had been exposed to the disease before its character was recognized

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