Foliorum centuriae, selections for translation into Latin and Greek prose, by H.A. Holden

الغلاف الأمامي
Hubert Ashton Holden
1864
 

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المحتوى

Spectator
37
58
38
The Epicureans
39
458
41
Letter
45
Reign of Augustus
47
The two Antonines
51
84
53
Grounds of criticism in tragedy
58
London after the battle
64
The Massacre of St Bartholomew A D 1572
70
Pragmatical meddling with other mens matters R South 116 Oliver Cromwellhiss eech to Sir Matthew Hale E Burke 117 Toleration of Christianity un...
73
Addison 119 The Emperor Majorian his zeal in preserving the ancient edifices of Rome E Gibbon 120 English and French Gardens 7 Addison
74
Gaiety and good humour
75
S Johnson 122 Felicity and industry Sir H Wotton
76
Porcius Cato repulsed from the Consulship 124 Character of Justinian
77
E Gibbon 125 Epitaphs S Johnson Universal happiness plan for devising impossible
78
True standard of the arts E Burke 128 Letter
79
Marie Antoinette
80
Lord Macaulay 131 Resentment
81
Our natural faculties limited 133 Of debt
82
Human nature by whom vilified
83
Addison 135 Of the true greatness of kingdoms
84
Lord Bacon
85
The force of custom in regard to a future life 7 Addison 137 Astronomy 138 Character of Oliver Cromwell Lord Clarendon
86
Benefits of learning
87
How flatterers are to be avoided N Machiavelli 141 Mans ingratitude
88
W Paley
89
The course of nature
101
Rhetorical blandishments
111
Lord Digby revealing himself to Sir John Hotham Lord Clarendon
114
Character
117
Indifference to outward circumstances Lord Bolingbroke
118
The Duke of York and Marshal Turenne
123
Taking of Pontefract Castle Cord Clarendon
126
Wellingtons address to the inhabitants of Oporto
127
Of mans free will
128
The pleasure of study and contemplation
129
Gradual change in mans estimate of pleasure
130
Independence of spirit
131
Moral of the story of Achilles and Chiron N Machiavelli
132
Duty of prosecutors E Burke
133
Youth
134
219
135
Surrender of the Carthaginians to the Roman army Sir W Ralegh 37 Judgments of wise men R Hooker
136
Interference of learning with business business Lord Bacon
138
Beesa pattern of good government F Holland
139
Comparison between Agathocles and Richard Sir W Ralegh
140
Death of Catherine Queen of Henry VIII
141
A dialogue G Berkeley
142
Character of Thomas Cromwell G Burnet
143
What kind of knowledge a student ought to attain I Barrow
144
Ridicule the talent of ungenerous tempers 7 Addison
145
Letter to the Duke of Grafton Junius
146
The original political state of the Roman Commons T Arnold
147
Latter days of Oliver Cromwell
148
Hume 149 Agriculture
149
Argument for love of God 7 Taylor
150
Prospect of death
151
The danger of procrastination A Cowley
152
The virtue of a commander
153
Character of John Hampden Lord Clarendon
154
Character of the Barbarians
155
E Gibbon
156
Cicero Conyers Middleton
157
Lord Bacon
158
Cardinal Wolsey Lord Herbert
159
serves attention 7 Addison
160
E Gibbon
161
Nelson R Southey
162
Sertorius Longs Pluarch
163
How to procure contentedness 7 Taylor
164
Punishment by ex post facto legislation
165
Virtue requires trial and exercise 7 Milton
166
Visit to the site of the mansion of Cornelia
167
Impiety of Dionysius
168
Effects of education upon character D Hume
170
Mere assent to moral propositions W Paley
172
Fiescos exhortations to the conspirators W Robertson
173
Letter to Buonamattai 7 Milton
174
F Cortes W Robertson
175
Talent of ridicule in the possession of an illcondi
176
Lord Bacon
183
Painful memory of departed folly
227
Swift
230
Letter to his Mother on the loss of his Aunt
233
406
238
Norman Conquest extraordin
242
Character
244
Disadvantages of an exalted reputation i Spectator
251
Reason not as some think an enemy to religion R Hooker
253
Emulation not to be confined to a narrow sphere
257
The punishment of the voluptuous 7 Addison
261
The Sienese and Charles V and Cosmo De Medici W Robertson
263
Deathbed scene
267
A letter on the qualifications of an historian F Milton
269
Protection of Greece
273
Operations before the battle of Floddenfield Lord Herbert
275
The world a heap of ruins
278
474
282
Eloquence how it differs from the other fine arts
283
An Africans speech
289
The true test of a good government
295
Lord Bacon his demeanour at his impeachment E Burke
301
Augustus Cæsarcharacter of his sovereignty
307
Frederic Count of Schomberg
313
Francis Henry Duke of Luxemburg
319
A virtuous old
323
Character of Xenophon
328
Non nimium credendum
329
Advantage of integrity
333
The desire of excelling
334
The Cornish rebels on Blackheath A D 1496 Lord Bacon
339
Of Ambition
340
Original rights of man in civil society
345
39
350
Louise of Savoy
351
From Rev Mr Horne to Junius 13
357
57 Unmerited praise the practice of giving censured S Johnson
361
Sensible things
368
Goodness how to be discerned
374
G Berkeley
380
Prevalent fashion of censuring public officers
385
Parliamentcommendation of their proceedings 7 Milton
388
109
389
Francisco Pizarro on the Island of Gorgona
394
Envy of virtue generally in the vicious Lord Bacon 158 Opinion 7 Selden
413
Prejudice in favour of an S Johnson 160 Life a dream Sir T Browne 161 Revenge and gratitude
414
Story of a dolphin Sir R Barckley
415
Guilt is never wise T Erskine 164 Democracy favourable to virtue Sir W Blackstone 165 Eros and Anteros
416
Milton 166 Prosperous usurpation E Burke 167 Lisbon under the government of Junot
417
R Southey 108 Asem the manhater and the genius
418
2
419
Insensibility to the planetary system P B Shelley 172 The principles of government E Burke
420
Darius Hystaspes his narrow escape out of Scythia Sir W Ralegh 174 A perfect democracy
421
E Burke 175 Customits twofold operation 7 Ruskin 176 Renunciation of freedom
422
Milton 177 Demosthenes C Thirlwall 178 Job iv 1317
423
E Burke 179 Covenants 7 Milton
424
Solon and Peisistratus W S Landor 181 Actions apart from moral considerations 182 Law against the admission of strangers
425
Aristophanes
426
R Porson 184 Factions
427
Lord Bacon 185 Negligence of learned men Lord Bacon Learning may pay homage to wealth Lord Bacon
428
Peccant humours of learning Lord Bacon 188 Praise of knowledge Lord Bacon
429
Inquiry into the souls nature Lord Bacon 190 The true source of poetry
430
Sir W Temple
431
History
435
Order in towns earlier than in the country
442
Division of command between Athens and Sparta Sir W Ralegh
448
The outpensioners of Chelsea College A D 1739 G Anson
454
E Burke
460
Kings debarred from the privilege of foreign travel
466
tioned man 7 Addison
471
Inundation in Holland
478
Deioceshis strict form of government
484
Poetryits superiority to all other arts
490
306
494
Gratitude
496
Of anger
498
Lord Bacon
499
Character of James I king of England D Hume
503
Dominion founded upon violence
516
Socrates and Aristophanes
523
Lady Jane Grey accepts the crown D Hume
529
Character
535
History

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الصفحة 439 - Romans, countrymen, and lovers! hear me for my cause; and be silent that you may hear: believe me for mine honour; and have respect to mine honour, that you may believe: censure me in your wisdom; and awake your senses that you may the better judge. If there be any in this assembly, any dear friend of Caesar's, to him I say, that Brutus' love to Ca;sar was no less than his.
الصفحة 40 - Reading maketh a full man, conference a ready man, and writing an exact man. And therefore, if a man write little, he had need have a great memory; if he confer little, he had need have a present wit; and if he read little, he had need have much cunning, to seem to know that he doth not. Histories make men wise; poets, witty; the mathematics, subtle; natural philosophy, deep; moral, grave; logic and rhetoric, able to contend.
الصفحة 67 - But the greatest error of all the rest is the mistaking or misplacing of the last or furthest end of knowledge. For men have entered into a desire of learning and knowledge, sometimes upon a natural curiosity and inquisitive appetite; sometimes to entertain their minds with variety and delight; sometimes for ornament and reputation; and sometimes to enable them to victory of wit and contradiction; and most times for lucre and profession; and seldom sincerely to give a true account of their gift of...
الصفحة 360 - Neither the perseverance of Holland, nor the activity of France, nor the dexterous and firm sagacity of English enterprise, ever carried this most perilous mode of hardy industry to the extent to which it has been pushed by this recent people ; a people who are still, as it were, but in the gristle, and not yet hardened into the bone of manhood.
الصفحة 86 - The heavens declare the glory of God: and the firmament sheweth his handywork. Day unto day uttereth speech, and night unto night sheweth knowledge. There is no speech nor language, where their voice is not heard.
الصفحة 103 - I cannot praise a fugitive and cloistered virtue, unexercised and unbreathed, that never sallies out and sees her adversary, but slinks out of the race where that immortal garland is to be run for, not without dust and heat.
الصفحة 273 - Magnanimity in politics is not seldom the truest wisdom; and a great empire and little minds go ill together.
الصفحة 243 - Now therein of all sciences — I speak still of human, and according to the human conceit — is our poet the monarch. For he doth not only show the way, but giveth so sweet a prospect into the way as will entice any man to enter into it.
الصفحة 439 - Brutus' love to Caesar was no less than his. If then that friend demand why Brutus rose against Caesar, this is my answer: Not that I loved Caesar less, but that I loved Rome more.

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