Horæ Momenta Cravenæ: Or, The Craven Dialect, Exemplified in Two Dialogues, Between Farmer Giles and His Neighbour Bridget. To which is Annexed a Copious Glossary

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Hurst, Robinson and Company, 1824 - 125 من الصفحات
 

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الصفحة 56 - They kindle a fire, and dress a repast of eggs and milk in the consistence of a custard. They knead a cake of oatmeal, which is toasted at the embers against a stone. After the custard is eaten up, they divide the cake...
الصفحة 47 - I also will laugh at your calamity; I will mock when your fear cometh. . . . Then shall they call upon me, but I will not answer; they shall seek me early, but they shall not find me: for that they hated knowledge, and did not choose the fear of the Lord.
الصفحة 56 - Every one, blindfold, draws out a portion. He who holds the bonnet is entitled to the last bit. Whoever draws the black bit is the devoted person who is to be sacrificed to Baal, whose favour they mean to implore, in rendering the year productive of the sustenance of man and beast. There is little doubt of these inhuman sacrifices having been once offered in this country, as well as in the east, although they now pass from the act of sacrificing, and only compel the devoted person to leap three times...
الصفحة 61 - BRIDE-ALE, Immediately after the performance of the marriage ceremony, a ribbon is proposed as the prize of contention, either for a foot or a horse race, to the future residence of the bride. Should, however, any of the doughty disputants omit to shake hands with the bride, he forfeits all claim to the prize, tho
الصفحة 56 - Beltan or 2&/-&2#-day, all the boys in a township or hamlet meet in the moors. They cut a table in the green sod, of a round figure, by casting a trench in the ground of such circumference as to hold the whole company. They kindle a fire, and dress a repast of eggs and milk in the consistence of a custard. They knead a cake of oatmeal, which is toasted at the embers against a stone. After the custard is eaten up, they divide the...
الصفحة 47 - thoughte o' that meat, which endureth unto ever" lasting life. Oh, then, my dear barns, tak warnin " by me, lest ye also come into this place of torment.
الصفحة 56 - They put all the bits of cake into a bonnet. Every one, blindfold, draws out a portion. He who holds the bonnet is entitled to the last bit. Whoever draws the black bit is the devoted person who is to be sacrificed to Baal, whose favour they mean to implore, in rendering the year productive of the sustenance of man and beast.
الصفحة 55 - There is another word of the same signification, and probably more antient than this, mentioned by Verstegan, though I do not recollect to have heard it in Craven. " The syd teeth, he remarks, are called wang teeth. Before the use of seals was in England, divers writings had the wax of them bitten with the r,'nng laoth of him that passed them...
الصفحة 113 - ... left hand over the right shoulder, aiming at the face of the bridegroom. This was done first by all the females in rotation; and afterwards the young men took the bride's stocking, and in the same manner threw it at her face. As the best marksman was to be married first, it is easy to conceive with what eagerness and anxiety this odd ceremony was performed by each party, as they doubtless supposed that the happiness of their future lives depended on the issue. It...
الصفحة 56 - Bal-tein signifies the Fire of Baal. Baal or Ball is the only word in Gaelic for a globe. This festival was probably in honour of the sun, whose return, in his apparent annual course, they celebrated, on account of his having such a visible influence by his genial warmth on the productions of the earth.

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