Shelley and the Romantic Imagination: A Psychological Study

الغلاف الأمامي
University of Delaware Press, 2007 - 359 من الصفحات
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Shelley was the most extreme and controversial of the English Romantics, and this book studies the most romantic element in his vision and in Romanticism in general: the attempt to bring to life imaginings of ideal eros and of a human paradise. Using concepts from Freud and such later psychoanalytic writers as Geza Roheim, Heinz Hartmann, Ernst Kris, Heinz Kohut, and Margaret Mahler, Shelley and the Romantic Imagination analyzes an interplay in Shelley between a regressive impulse to return to union with the mother and an aggressive, progressive impulse toward a separate, autonomous ego.

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Acknowledgments
9
Texts and Quotations
11
Preface
15
Adams Dream or the Romantic Imagination
23
Magician of the Enlightenment
35
Proteus and Mutability The Alastor Volume
43
The Quest for the Veiled Maid
47
Doubles and Similitudes
60
Prometheus Unbound Act 2
157
Prometheus Unbound Act 3
185
Prometheus Unbound Act 4
203
The Right Road to Paradise
227
A Dream of Life
229
Shelleys Rousseau and Shelleys Dante
257
Imagination and the Heart
272
Imagination and Vision
276

The Sole Self
70
The Voyage to the Source
77
Psychosexual Patterns in Alastor
84
Introduction The Glory of Passivity and the Glory of Action
99
The Revolution of the Golden City
101
Prometheus Unbound The Prometheus Myth
122
Prometheus Unbound Act 1
130
Imagination and Negativity
288
Imagination and SelfKnowledge
293
Notes
301
Works Cited
329
Index
345
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الصفحة 72 - I can give not what men call love, But wilt thou accept not The worship the heart lifts above And the Heavens reject not, — The desire of the moth for the star, Of the night for the morrow, The devotion to something afar From the sphere of our sorrow?
الصفحة 55 - Or sculpture, speak in feeble imagery Their own cold powers. Art and eloquence, And all the shows o' the world, are frail and vain To weep a loss that turns their lights to shade. It is a woe 'too deep for tears' when all Is reft at once, when some surpassing Spirit, Whose light adorned the world around it, leaves Those who remain behind, not sobs or groans, The passionate tumult of a clinging hope, — But pale despair and cold tranquillity, Nature's vast frame, the web of human things, Birth and...
الصفحة 29 - Rescued from death by force, though pale and faint. Mine, as whom wash'd from spot of child-bed taint Purification in the old law did save, And such, as yet once more I trust to have Full sight of her in Heaven without restraint, Came vested all in white, pure as her mind : Her face was veil'd, yet to my fancied sight Love, sweetness, goodness in her person shined So clear, as in no face with more delight : But O as to embrace me she inclined, I waked, she fled, and day brought back my night.
الصفحة 179 - Life of Life ! thy lips enkindle With their love the breath between them ; And thy smiles before they dwindle Make the cold air fire; then screen them In those looks, where whoso gazes Faints, entangled in their mazes. Child of Light ! thy limbs are burning Through the vest which seems to hide them...
الصفحة 151 - On a poet's lips I slept, Dreaming like a love-adept In the sound his breathing kept. Nor seeks nor finds he mortal blisses, But feeds on the aerial kisses Of shapes that haunt thought's wildernesses. He will watch from dawn to gloom The lake-reflected sun illume The yellow bees in the ivy-bloom, Nor heed nor see what things they be : But from these create he can Forms more real than living man, Nurslings of immortality.
الصفحة 222 - To love, and bear; to hope till Hope creates From its own wreck the thing it contemplates; Neither to change, nor falter, nor repent; This, like thy glory, Titan, is to be Good, great and joyous, beautiful and free; This is alone Life, Joy, Empire, and Victory!
الصفحة 125 - The only imaginary being resembling in any degree Prometheus, is Satan; and Prometheus is, in my judgment, a more poetical character than Satan, because, in addition to courage, and majesty, and firm and patient opposition to omnipotent force, he is susceptible of being described as exempt from the taints of ambition, envy, revenge, and a desire for personal aggrandisement, which, in the Hero of Paradise Lost, interfere with the interest.
الصفحة 180 - My soul is an enchanted boat, Which, like a sleeping swan, doth float Upon the silver waves of thy sweet singing ; And thine doth like an angel sit Beside the helm conducting it, Whilst all the winds with melody are ringing.
الصفحة 47 - He who has nothing external that can divert him, must find pleasure in his own thoughts, and must conceive himself what he is not; for who is pleased with what he is? He then expatiates in boundless futurity, and culls from all imaginable conditions that which for the present moment he should most desire, amuses his desires with impossible enjoyments, and confers upon his pride unattainable dominion.
الصفحة 232 - And unto this he frames his song: Then will he fit his tongue To dialogues of business, love, or strife; But it will not be long Ere this be thrown aside, And with new joy and pride The little Actor cons another part; Filling from time to time his "humorous stage...

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