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Ramsay, William, his · Vindication Rival Beauties, mother and daugh.
of Astrology,' viii. 118

ter, ii. 49
Ramus, Peter, French professor, Road, right of, customs observed,
vi. 9 and note

ii. 244 and note
Raphael's cartoons, Steele's criti- Robin, Porter at Will's Coffee-

cism of, iii. 276 et seq., vi. 39; house, vi. 15
from a correspondent praising the Rochefoucauld, vii. 308 and note
criticism, 360

Rochester, John Wilmot, Earl of,
Rapin, French historian, i. 228 note i. 9 note; ji. 52 note; iv. 281
Rattling Clubs, viii. 310

and note
Rawlinson, Thomas, vii. 336 and Roman Catholic Church, iii. 159
note

Romans : wars with Sabines, ii. 4;
Read, Sir William, oculist, vi. 366 patriotism of Roman ladies, ii. 5
and note

Rope-dancing, i. 146 and note
Reason, the great evils arising from Rosamond's Pond, iv. 313 and note

its abuse, i. 32 el seq.; Sir Roger's Roscommon, Lord, his translation of
reflections, 33;

Sir Richard Horace quoted, i. 202, 217, 231
Blackmore quoted, 35 and note and note; iii. 53; iv. 10 note
Rebus, the, its antiquity, i. 305; Rosicrucians, the, v. 310, 311 and

Cæsar, Cicero, and Marcus Au- note; viii. 81
relius cited, 306; Newberry's re- Round Court, St. Martin's-in-the-
bus mentioned by Camden, 306 ; Fields, iv. 274
a rebus at Blenheim House cen- Rowe, Nicholas, playwriter, i. 206
sured, 307

note; vii. 146 note
Rechteren, Count, vii. 38 and note Rowley, John, master of mechanics
Recommendations, servants', their to George I., vii. 386 and note
questionableness, vii. 93

Royal Exchange, i. 358 ; ii. 352
Religion, zeal for, false, iii. 81; re- and note ; vi. 281 and note ; vii.

marks in favour of a future state, 168; viii. 53
iii. 86 ; essays on its nature, vi. Royal Society, the, i. 54; ii. 193;

302, vii. 97
Religious essays on the Passion, v. Ruelle, the path between a bedside
188

and wall, i. 233 and note
Republics of Amazons and men, Rycaut, Sir Paul, v. 121 and note

vi. 180, 182
Reputation, its stability, iii. 239

SABINES and Romans, wars of, ii. 4
Revelry, essay on, v. 204

Sacheverell, Dr. Henry, cited, i.
Revenge, an instance of, viii. 239 296 note
Rich, Christopher, Drury Lanellst. Asaph, Bishop of, ii

. 121
manager, cited, i. 31 and note ; St. Paul's Cathedral, vii. 386
iv. 34 note

Salamanders, a kind of heroine in
Rich, how to grow, iv. 158; ad- chastity, iii. 141

vantages of being, vi. 255 et Sallust, Roman historian, i. 204
seg.

and note ; ïi. 422 ; iv, 18
Richard III., i. 165

Salmon, Mrs., waxwork exhibitress,
Richelieu, Cardinal, iv. 210, 277 i. 144 and note ; viii. 230 and
Riches, a comparison of poverty note
and riches, vi. 328

Salutation, general remarks on, iv.
Ridicule of age by the Athenians, 39 et seq., at the theatre, 95

i. 36; Addison's essay on laughter Sanctorius, Paduan professor of
and ridicule, iii. 384

medicine, i. 129 and note
Ring, the, a favourite promenade Sappho, her poetical fragments
in Hyde Park, i. 82 and note, 381; among the most beautiful of an-

cient poetry, iii. 259 et seq.; trans-

iv. 54

ii. 36

lation of one of her odes, 262,

290; takes the lover's leap, 312
Sarasin, Jean François, French

writer, i. 314 and note
Satire, the satire of the ancients

instructive as to the manners of
their times, iii. 197 ; a satire of
Simonides, supposed to be the
oldest extant, 197 et seq.; satires
of Juvenal and Boileau, 200;
Dryden's satire of 'Absalom and
Achitophel,' 257 ; Trajan Boc-
calini quoted, iv. 204 ; on the
bearing of reproach by authors,
v. 184 ; satirical authors, vi. 262;
the Spectator's satire on writers
who employ blank names, viii.

51, 53
Scales, Addison's allegory, vi. 323
Scaliger, the younger, viii. 29
Scandal denounced, v. 149; method

of combating it, v. 359; exami-
nation of, vi. 152; difficulty of
restraining scandal of writers, vi.
263 ; methods of ridding oneself
of the propensity to propagate

scandal, viii. 166
Scanderbeg, Prince of Epirus, iv.

90 and note ; 343
Scaramouche, famous Italian co-

median, iv, 160
Scarron, the Abbé Paul, husband

of Madame de Maintenon, i. 89

and note
Scawen, Sir William, his genero-

sity, iii. 382 and note
Scheffer, John, his · Lapponia,' v.

249 note; vi. 52
Scholar's Egg, an oval poem so-

called, i. 300
Schoolmasters, Addison's essay

upon, ii. 361; their severity

censured, 415
Scott, Dr. John, author of the

Christian Life,' vi. 245 and note
Scudéry's romances, iii. 349
Scurlock, Mary, Steele's love-letters

to her, 289 note, 290 et seq.
Sebastian, Don, king of Portugal,

v. 156
Sedley, vi. 241
Segrais, Jean Regnauld de, French

poet, i. 327 and note
Seneca, i. 199 and note, 401 note;

ii. 59 and note, 363 ; iii. 302, 330 ;

v. 291
Sentry, Capt., a member of the

Spectator's club, his character, i.
13; and identification, 13 note ;
advice to the Spectator, 175; on
indifference to death in the army,
ii. 337 ; takes part in the discus-
sion on the status of trade, iii. 25;
on lawyers, 136; visits the play
with the Spectator and Sir Roger,
V. 79; reads an account of an
English captain's sufferings, 157;
succeeds to Sir Roger's estate, vii.

212, 344
Seriousness of temper, viii. 181
Sermons, the object of them, v. 330
Servants, complaint aginst the cor-

rupted manners of men-servants,
ii. 33; Sir Roger de Coverley's
treatment of, 122 ; a valet's com-
plaint, 265; complaint of an
under lady's-maid, 266; how-d'ye
servants, 299 and note; a foot-
man's complaint against his
master, iii. 164; the petition of
John Steward and others against
family spies, 164; the question.
able nature of their recommen-

dations, vii. 93
Sexes, their characteristic diffe-

rences, ii. 223
Sextus, Pope, his punishment of a

satirist, i. 120.
Shadwell, Thomas, playwriter, i.

179 and note, 251 note; ii. 347

note
Shakespeare, i. 90, 202 ; Hamlet

quoted, 226, 235, 316, 344 ; ii.
166, 287 ; iii. 24 note, 204, 236,
365; vi. 114; vii. 52, 231, 329;

viii. 162
Shepherd, Miss, ii. 54 note
Sherlock, Dr., his ‘Discourse on

Death,' iv. 193 and note; vii. 186
Shoeing-horns, a species of women's

men, vii. 306
Shovel, Sir Cloudesly, his monu-

ment in Westminster Abbey, i.

136 and 137 note; v, 48
Sidney, Sir Philip, i. 76, 364; iv.

127 note
Sieges of hearts, opportunities of

the army, viii. 46

Southerne, Thomas, playwriter, i.

206 and note ; ü. 57 and note ;

vii. 37 and note
Sparkes, John, swordsman, vi. 191

and note
Sparrows, for the opera, i. 28, 78
Spartans or Lacedemonians, the,
their virtue applauded by the

Athenians, i. 37
Spectator, the, its predecessors, i.

intro. xii-xxv; conception and
history and analysis of nature,
XXV-xxxviii; sale, xxxvi; author-
ship of the papers, xxxvii, xliv ;
successors, xxxviii; influence and
imitators, xlii; minor contribu-
tors, xliv ; its publishers and the
copyright value, 7 note; the Spec-
tator's remarks on the objects of
his speculations and benefits issu-
ing from them, iv. 51 et seq. ;
v. 253; its price as affected by
the newspaper tax, vi. 231, vii.

70
Spectator, the, his description of
himself, i. I et seq.; his club, 1,
7, 8 et seq.; his club's advice
to him, 173 et seq.; anxiety to
hear the world's opinion of him,
22; ill-luck at the table of an

quaintance whose wife
superstitious, 37; outline of the
Spectator's sphere and the good
work proposed to be done by
it, 52; his several lodgings in
London, 63; determination to
attack affectation and vice, 84 ;
and to keep clear of party issues,
87; uncommon shortness of his
face, 90 ; mentioned as a counter-
action to possible envy from his
fame, 102; the correction of
impudence among his under-
takings, 103; espousal of the
cause of virtue, 177 ; visits a
travelled lady who received her
visitors in bed, 234 ; minutes in-
tended for speculations picked up
at Lloyd's Coffee-House, 237 ;
Hecatissa's letter to him begging
his recommendation to the Ugly
Club, 249; a match proposed
between her and the Spectator,
268 ; household economy, ii. 7;

was
to

viii. 90

Sight, the sense of, vi. 72, 369
Sign-posts, London street signs,

i. 142 and notes
Silenus, ii. 28
Simonides of Amorgos, Greek poet,

iii. 197 and note; vii. 379
Sincerity, Tillotson's Sermon on,

reviewed, ii. 106 and note; re-

marks on, 106
Singularity, general desire to avoid,
Sleeping exhibitions, iii. 77
Sly, John, observer for the Spectator,

vii. 255 and note, 258, 287, 298,

353
Smiglecius, Martin, Polish Jesuit,

iii. 340 note
Smith, Edmund, playwriter, his tra-

gedy of Phædra and Hippolitus,'

i. 97 and note, 206 and note
Smithfield bargain, iv. 271 and note
Smoke (to ridicule), v. 83 and note
Snape, Dr. Andrew, iv. 217 and

note
Snuff - taking, practice of among

women, v. 129
Society, the blanks of, i. 54 ; coun-

try, vii. I

Socrates, i. 279 and note, 348, 119;

ii. 25 and note, 27, 245, 310; iii.
73, 185, 219, 339, 375; iv. 28

viii. II
Soho Square, i. 9 note
Solitude, exemption from passions

the only pleasing solitude, i. 22 ;
methods of separating from the
world without withdrawing into

solitude, iv. 62 et seq.
Solomon, the apocryphal ‘Wisdom

of Solomon,' iii. 244, 275, viii.
254 ; paraphrase of the Song of,

V. 349
Somers, Lord, dedication, i. xlix,

and note
Somervile, Sir Philip de, custom

connected with the holding of his

manors, viii. 221, 224
Somerville's Chase,' ii. 162 note
Sophocles, i. 229 and note; vii.

379
Sorites, a, iii. 342 and note
Soul, relation of dreams to, vii. 65;

speculations on, 279; immortality
of, 310; faculties of, viii. 188

town

on

diversions, il; inquisitive tem-
per, 21; visit to Sir Roger de
Coverley at his country house,
117; remarks on preachers, 121;
observations on the excellent
management of servants of Sir
Roger de Coverley, 122; meets
Will Wimble at Sir Roger's,
126; in Sir Roger's gallery,
131 ; love of nature and solitude
136, 175, 183; at church with
Sir Roger, 145; goes coursing
with Sir Roger, and exhibits an
instance of his taciturnity, 166 ;
introduced by Sir Roger to a
supposed witch, 171; visits the
Assizes with Sir Roger, 196 ;
experience of gipsies, 233; re-
solves to return
account of the inquisitiveness of
the neighbourhood, 237; sum-
moned to return by his club, 239 ;
narrative of his journey and com-
panions, 240; discussion at the
club on animosity displayed be-
tween parties with common in-
terests, iii. 25; the two general
divisions of his readers, and the
necessity of writing for both,
50; his weaknesses criticised in
a coffee - house, 237 ; remarks
upon the mottoes prefixed to his
papers, 250; and upon the initial
letters signed at the end, 252;
meeting with Sir Roger in Gray's
Inn Walks, iv. 90; personal ap-
probation of the Church and
constitutional government of Eng.
land, 180; receives a letter from
a possible rival of Hecatissa,
and replies thereto, 199; revisits
Westminster Abbey with Sir
Roger, v. 46, 55 ; visits the play
with Sir Roger and Captain
Sentry, 79; aversion to reply-
ing to detractors with satires
and lampoons, 184; love affairs
narrated at the club, 209; dis-
courses on the advantages arising
from his papers, 253; visits
Spring Garden with Sir Roger,
325; remarks on the contribu-
tions sent to him for publication,
vi. 218; on the price of his papers,

231, vii. 70; receives the news
of Sir Roger's death, 210; and
of Will Honeycomb's marriage,
274; verses in praise of him,
283; meets a contributor at his
bookseller's, 303; replies to cer-
tain remarks of his correspon-
dents and contributors, 334 ;
prints some testimonials to the
value of his paper, 359; receives
the news of Sir Andrew Free-
port's retirement, 369; his club
entirely dispersed, 372; considera-
tions of a new club, 372, 389;
farewell remarks to his readers,
400; the authorship of certain
papers, 401 ; acknowledgments
to various contributors, 402; the
new club elected, viii. 1; endea-
vours to overcome his taciturnity,
2 ; letters on the same from his
correspondents, 19; satire on
writers who employ blank names,
51; criticism of the same at a coffee-
house, 53; answers in brief the
letters of various correspondents,
113, 267 ; consults a magician at
Grand Cairo, 207; concerning the
publication of his eighth volume,

317
Spectator's Club, the, i. 1, 7, 8 et

seq., 173; ii. 239; iii. 25; iv.
348 ; v. 157, 209; vii. 210, 274,

369, 372, 389; viii. I
Spenser, Edmund, cited, v. 359 ;

vii. 82; criticism of, vii. 323
Spies, court, vi. 206
Spies, family. See Family-spies
Spleen, the, an excuse for dulness,
Spring Gardens, Old and New, v.

325 and note
Stage : Addison's essays upon the

English theatre and tragedy, i.
215 et seq., 225 et seq. ; remarks
upon comedy, 231; British taste
for murder on the stage, 228 ;
French criticism of this taste,
228 and note; the custom on the
French stage, 228 ; stage thunder,
185 and note, 215, 225, viii. 159;
stage lions at the Haymarket, i.
67, 72; bawdry in English plays,
262; cruder class of acting com-

i. 275

mented upon, ii. 284; bad Eginhart and Imma, 65; the
manners in the theatre, 346, 419 Castilian couple and the rene-
and note ; stage fright, iii. 299; gado, 142; the tragedy of St.
the “Trunk-maker in the upper Christopher, 226; the

rival
gallery,' 319, 346 ; stage manage- preachers, 251 ; a Jewish tradi-
ment, iv. 33; remarks on the tion concerning Moses, 331 ;
ladies of the audience, 94 ; story of Irus, iv. 64; story of
desire for a theatre of ease to Scaramouche, 160; and of Rabe.
Covent Garden, iv. 33 ; Steele's lais, 161; the dervish and the
criticism of the English stage, king's palace, 194; the critic and
-v. 270 ; stage morality, vi. 235; Apollo, 204 ; the judge and the
audiences and their tastes, vii. old fellow-scholar, 325; Escalus
134 ; essay on gesture and voice and Isabella, 352 ; of Octavia, v.
in dramatic performance, 328 ; 1; the French privateer and the
dramatic critics, viii. 160

English captain, 157 ; of Don
Stanley, Dean, ii. 89 note

Sebastian, King of Portugal, 156;
Stapylton, Sir Robert, his 'Slighted Madame de Villacerfe and the
Maid'cited, i. 185 note

surgeon, 257 ; story of Amanda,
Starers, condemnation of, i. 103, 291; the sepulchre of Rosicrucius;
276

transformation of Fidelio into
Stationer, petition of a, iv. 273 a looking-glass, 367; story of
Stationer's Company, their error in Cynthio and Flavia, vi. 14; of
printing the Bible, viii. 104

the Valentine family, 147 ; of
Steele, Richard, i. intro. vii.- xli, 26 Favilla, 196; of Biton and Clito.

note, 256 note, 257 note, 261 note, bus, vii. 49; Charles the Bold
262 and note, 343 note, 344 note ; and Rhynsault, 84; a general
ii. vi note, 56 note, 126 note, 205 officer in the Civil Wars, 110;
note, 259 note, 275 note, 289 note, Don Sebastian of Portugal, 112 ;
290 et seq., 315 note, 352 note, Pope Leo the Tenth, 112; the
365 note, 370 note, 407 note ; iii. Persian fairs of women, 117;
26 note, 238 note, 278 note, 279 the siege of Hensberg, 120 ;
note, 321 note; iv, 7 note, 12 note, Tartar auctions of women, 179;
16 note, 35 note, 85 note, 95 note, of Cyrus the Great and the noble-
196 note; v. 36 note, 94 note, 109 man, viii. 37 ; of Isadas the
note, 129 note, 189 note, 213 and Spartan, 39; of Fadlallah and
note, 274 note, 305 note, 330 note, the dervish, 99; of Diana's dogs
349 note, 378 and note; vi. 46 in the temple of Vulcan, 105;
note, 67 note, 85 and note, 131 Harpath and Shalum and their
note ; vii. 204, 283 note

courtship of Hilpa, 124, 128 ;
Sternhold and Hopkins, iii. 180 Rhæcus and the nymph, 148;
and note

Gyges and Aglais, 233; a Spanish
Stirling, William Alexander, Earl lady's revenge, 239
of, iv, 249 and note

Story-telling, vii. 314
Stocks market, vi. 278 and note Strada's ‘Prolusions,' iii. 350; viii.
Stoicism, iii. 358

262
Stories told in the Spectator : Inkle Strafford, Lord and Lady, iv. II

and Yarico, i. 59 and note; the Street cries, iii. 394 and note; v.
colonel and his servant, ii. 37 ; 296
Monsieur Pontignan's love ad- Strops for razors, vi. 158 and note
venture, 46; romance of change- Stuart, James, the elder Pretender,
lings, 200; a stolen child re- i. 19 and note
covered from the gipsies, 235; Stubbs, Kev. Philip, ii. 315
Constantia and Theodosius, 394 ; Suckling of children, remarks on,
Herod and Mariamne, iii. 12; iii. 370

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