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out on the first legitimate provoca- channels were intricate and the tion, and, whether he shoots his forts ugly, and that, all things conman or is shot, the affair ends ; but sidered, it was just as well to have he who declines and hesitates gen- nothing to do with them. Nelson erally ends by such a disparagement found his way through more torof his courage, that he must fight tuous windings, in that self-same some half-dozen times to set himself sea, to find at the end very differight with the world.

rent batteries from those of SweWhy is France at the head of borg or Bommersund ; but he was Europe? Simply because she is one of those who were “ready with ready with the pistol. War may be the pistol.” all that you like to say of it. The I do not believe that the Nation Quakers have done the vituperation at large is anything but what it also perfectly that I need not repeat ways was. I am convinced that it ; but there have always been to-morrow we could count upon wars, and there will always be wars every great quality of noble heroism in the world; and a drab-coated and daring that have given us our broad - brimmed thee - and - thou name in history. planet would be as dreary and But we want a little of that intasteless as a ball in a counting- discipline of our fathers—that rehouse. So long as England was sistance to dictation, let it come ready with the pistol, there was not from press or public—that haughty a nation in Europe dared to insult spirit which did not stop to count her. The men who guided our des- the cost when an insult was to be tinies through all the great wars of wiped out, and which, if it occasionthe First Empire were certainly not ally led us into embarrassments, heaven-born statesmen in point of ended by making our nation the ability to devise, or eloquence to freest and the foremost of Europe. support, their measures—they were Say what we may, we are not a possibly very inferior to those who military people, and the best proof now sit on the Treasury benches of it is this — that we never can

In the Liverpool Cabinet were no fight unless we are angry. I half such really professional statesmen wish that we were a little angry as we see in the present Ministry; now, if only that one result should and yet, compare the England of follow, and that we could show the that day-one-eighth less in popu- world that the time is not gone by lation, scarcely much more than when we could be “ready with the half as rich, as at present-com- pistol.” pare that England with this, and But one word more. I am not will all the boastful leaders of the indifferent to-I am deeply grate'Times' reconcile you to the dif- ful for—the improved tone of our ference? We were ready with the civilisation, by which we have suppistol in 1808; we were ready with pressed the fire - eater and put it, also, after the rupture of the down the bully. I know of nothing peace at Amiens; and ready enough so creditable to our manners, as in 1815, too, when we played for that tacit understanding amongst the heaviest stake we had ever all gentlemen, that the ruffian is ventured.

not to be tolerated who, on the For myself, I'd rather have seen strength of his skill with a pisNapier's fleet come back from the tol, presumes to lord it over soBaltic, shot-struck and disabled, ciety. I think that by this step with damaged rigging and smashed alone we have established an indisbulwarks, to tell that they had putable right to declare that we found the Russians tough custom- have made some progress in civilisaers—able to give as good as they tion. took-than see them sail into the I think, too, it is an immense Downs without a spar injured or gain to good breeding, and consea block missing, and hear that the quently to the enjoyment of all

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sounded, he comes home of the unfortunate man in question? he field a hero. The news- Be ready with the pistol indeed!

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E he can but drive out with of every one — not because you 2 in a sling, his fortune is were quarrelsome or contentious,

and his recognition in a not because, being steady of hand made as smile of bland and tri- and unerring of eye, you could umphant heroism, is a thing to be venture to assume a tone that was accepted with gratitude. Contrast likely to be resented—but simply this Eh the Englishman, hiding because, with such French as they not alone from the law, but from taught you at Rugby, you would

opinion; not merely dread- not permit the Count Hyppolite de

heir he was to have open café, but threatened to throw more fearing his aunt in Chelten- defame your countrywomen in an been, but who, being “a Christian him and his shako into the street.

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out on the first legitimate provoca channels were intricate and the tion, and, whether he shoots his forts ugly, and that, all things conman or is shot, the affair ends ; but sidered, it was just as well to have he who declines and hesitates gen- nothing to do with them. Nelson erally ends by such a disparagement found his way through more torof his courage, that he must fight tuous windings, in that self-same some half-dozen times to set himself sea, to find at the end very differight with the world.

rent batteries from those of SweWhy is France at the head of borg or Bommersund; but he was Europe? Simply because she is one of those who were “ready with ready with the pistol. War may be the pistol." all that you like to say of it. The I do not believe that the Nation Quakers have done the vituperation at large is anything but what it also perfectly that I need not repeat ways was. I am convinced that it ; but there have always been to-morrow we could count upon wars, and there will always be wars every great quality of noble heroism in the world ; and a drab-coated and daring that have given us our broad - brimmed thee - and - thou name in history. planet would be as dreary and But we want a little of that intasteless as a ball in a counting- discipline of our fathers—that rehouse. So long as England was sistance to dictation, let it come ready with the pistol, there was not from press or public—that haughty a nation in Europe dared to insult spirit which did not stop to count her. The men who guided our des- the cost when an insult was to be tinies through all the great wars of wiped out, and which, if it occasionthe First Empire were certainly not ally led us into embarrassments, heaven-born statesmen in point of ended by making our nation the ability to devise, or eloquence to freest and the foremost of Europe. support, their measures—they were Say what we may, we are not a possibly very inferior to those who military people, and the best proof now sit on the Treasury benches. of it is this — that we never can

In the Liverpool Cabinet were no fight unless we are angry, I half such really professional statesmen wish that we were a little angry as we see in the present Ministry; now, if only that one result should and yet, compare the England of follow, and that we could show the that day-one-eighth less in popu- world that the time is not gone by lation, scarcely much more than when we could be “ ready with the half as rich, as at present-com- pistol.” pare that England with this, and But one word more. I am not will all the boastful leaders of the indifferent to—I am deeply grate* Times' reconcile you to the dif- ful for-the improved tone of our ference? We were ready with the civilisation, by which we have suppistol in 1808; we were ready with pressed the fire - eater and put it, also, after the rupture of the down the bully. I know of nothing peace at Amiens; and ready enough so creditable to our manners, as in 1815, too, when we played for that tacit understanding amongst the heaviest stake we had ever all gentlemen, that the ruffian is ventured.

not to be tolerated who, on the For myself, I'd rather have seen strength of his skill with a pisNapier's fleet come back from the tol, presumes to lord it over soBaltic, shot -struck and disabled ciety. I think that by this step with damaged rigging and smashed alone we have established an indisbulwarks, to tell that they had putable right to declare that we found the Russians tough custom- have made some progress in civilisaers—able to give as good as they tion. took-than see them sail into the I think, too, it is an immense Downs without a spar injured or gain to good breeding, and consea block missing, and hear that the quently to the enjoyment of all

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social intercourse, that, instead of, Corpus, our bitter beer, or our beef. as formerly, merging all question Foreigners, let it be remembered, of right and wrong in a hostile will neither understand nor give us meeting, men are obliged nowadays credit for it. If there is anything to stand forth before the world in our ways and habits totally not alone to vindicate their charac- above their comprehension, it is ters for honour and honesty, but for our system — whether in political good temper and for forbearance, or social life- of dispensing with

We have got thus far in England, checks. That public opinion can and I would only say, let us not keep the peace in the street and in imperil this immense boon by pre- the salon is a hopeless riddle to suming too far on its benefits; and, them. And now I have done, I above all, let us not forget that this trust not to be misunderstood, and great change in manners has made that they who have had the patience but little progress beyond the limits to follow me, will see when and of our own country, and is still as why I deem a “man should be essentially English as our Habeas ready with the pistol.”

THE UNLUCKY NUMBER.

There are certain “Shams "-I could seize on the spoils. Her hate the word, for it is a pet one of “dignified reserve," as the “Monithe greatest of all shams—which teur' so beautifully styles it, rethe world is at last getting weary of. minds me of a scene I once witDiplomatic councils! The veriest nessed in a Mississippi steamer. tyro in the study of human nature There was, as is usual, a large party must know the hopelessness of engaged at play in the cabin-very bringing men to discuss a subject high play-stimulated by strong of direct interest to themselves. passion and strong drink; and a Of the thirteen wise men who dispute arose as to the rightful formed the late Conference, each winner of the pool. The discussion had a distinct and separate object was very violent, the language used to attain. To take the principals : of the strongest, and intimations Denmark desired not to be dis- were exchanged that when once membered ; Prussia wished not on shore the matter should be deonly to dismember, but to absorb a termined by an appeal to something large proportion of the fragments; besides words—when suddenly an Austria had assisted at the dismem- immensely large man, so tall that berment only to show the rest of he towered by a head above his Germany that she was as patriotic fellows, arose, and, drawing himself as Prussia, and could be as brutal, up to his full height, cried out, as unjust, and as fond of pillage, as “I'll have none of this! Here's if she had been a Lutheran state; how it's to be ;' and he struck the England endeavoured to keep the table with his fist a blow that peace, because in no possible even- made it resound. “Every gentletuality could war give her anything man in this cabin has his revolver except an increase to her debt; and his bowie-knife : let us put while France, whose whole object out the lights, and see who'll have has been for years past the spread the money!” It is needless to say of distrust through Europe, the how quickly the proposal scattered rupture of the ties that once bound the company, nations together, and more espe- Now, the Conference we have cially the complete isolation of just witnessed did not end without England - France looked on de- results because the Danes were lighted at the grand imbroglio, obstinate, or the Prussians inordiwell knowing that the time of nate in their demands, or the Ausanarchy was coming, when she trians undecided whether to out

rage England or the “ Bund." The the greatest calculations failed to Conference was a failure simply accomplish, we have brought about because France would take no part by the insensate stupidity of not in its deliberations. France was believing that an insignificant intelthere to be the dignified spectator lect may become dominant in an of an unruly discussion-the one age of mediocrity, and that there calm, well-bred individual in a are eras in life in which the craft of brawling company. While one a conspirator can take the place of screamed the “Schlei!" and another the statesman. I am quite sure we yelled the “Dannewerk!” France ought never to have gone to war only smiled blandly on each, gently about Denmark. Her cause was hinting how honourable were all not at any time one of that clear, strong convictions, and how refresh- palpable, unmistakable nature that ing it was to witness such ardour justifies going to war for. It would in an age that had been reproached have been like trying to settle a with its cold infidelity. She saw, case in equity by a duel! The in fact, that by simply waiting “the Danish question was precisely one lights would be put out," and she for a Chancery suit, and it might knew who'd get the money.

have followed the fortunes of one The “power of the unknown if it had not been that a very small number is incommensurable," was Prussian, M. Bismarck, bad got into a maxim of the First Napoleon, and his head the ambition of being a in the reserve-in the unexpressed great Minister. To turn off the determination of the present Em- attention of the Radicals at home peror, lies all his weight at this he got up the row abroad ; and we, moment. The press of Germany instead of aiding the Liberal party, assures him that the hour is com- as we might and ought to have ing in which he will destroy for done, by unmasking his roguery, ever the boasted maritime supre- and showing that the attack on macy of England, and humble the Denmark was a mere fraud,-we Power that has so long been mis- actually took him at his word, and tress of the seas. The English affected to believe him to be the papers assure him that he may have advanced-guard of German Liberalthe Rhine for the asking! and thus ism, the herald of that mighty spirit this accident of an accident, by that comes out every fifty years or our unstatesmanlike courses, by our so, to sing, “ Wo ist das Deutsches want of foresight, and our utter Vaterland ?Dumas tells us someforgetfulness of even late history, where of a mayor in France that is now the master of Europe. endowed his native town with a

We have done for this man all lake, but which, as it was only three that genius, which he has not, and inches deep at its deepest part, noall that craft, which he has, could body would accept as a real piece possibly have done for him. We of water, till one day, by some accihave broken up all the coalitions dent, a wild duck, a solitary bird of which years of common danger had eccentric taste, actually descended cemented, and the friendships we and alighted on the pond ; taking had pledged when fighting side by it, as he quaintly says, "au sérieux." side for the same cause ; we have From that hour the mayor's trimade him great, not from any quali- umph was assured. Now Lord ties of greatness in himself, but Russell performed the wild duck to because we brought ourselves so M. Bismarck's lake; and had henever low that we stand humbled before gone paddling there, the water him.

would have dried up long ago, and All that the great Emperor could the stench of the swamp would not do with his genius, the little have kept off all invaders. Emperor has done by our folly. Bismarck never believed in SchlesWhat the grandest conceptions and wig-Holstein any more than the

VOL. XCVI.—NO. DLXXXVI.

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