Public Papers of George Clinton, First Governor of New York, 1777-1795, 1801-1804 ...

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James Black to Governor ClintonOn clothing returns uncertain
51
Governor Clinton to the Board of War in relation to appointments
57
The Governor to James Clinton in relation to military commis
59
Return of new levies commanded by Colonel Pawling
65
July
67
22
69
President McKean to Governor ClintonAct of Congress respect
71
Four affidavits of Joshua Ilobart implicating individuals
77
Secretary Benson informs Captain Muller the Governor is unable
83
Orders to captains to receive levies and urgency demanded
89
William Duer forwards a suspect to the Governor
95
Printer Loudon advocates the cause of the post riders to the Gov
101
An Act of Congress to provide for the refugees of South Carolina
116
Brooks supplements Sheriff Nicolls application in behalf
126
Colonel Ilay sends Governor Clinton military news from the South
134
Governor Clinton directs Colonel Thomas to appoint Lieutenant
137
Governor Clinton to WashingtonIn regard to levies and the pro
143
Ezra lHommedieu to the Governor on Vermont affairsThe Gov
149
Governor Clinton sends Colonel Hay military news 155
155
The Governor brings before the Legislature the financial com
162
Henry Wisner to Governor ClintonLevies of Colonel Allisons
168
Messrs Duane and lHommedieu forward evidence of treason from
174
Lieutenant Francis Hamners application to the Governor for
180
Governor Clinton writes to Colonel Willett in regard to the Ver
186
Captain Henry Godwin reports progress to Governor Clinton con
192
Major John Davis to Captain John GrenellRelating to two Long
198
Major James Logan writes to Governor Clinton regarding
205
Correspondence between Colonel Hay and Colonel Timothy Picker
213
Major Moses Hetfield visits posts on the Ulster frontier forwards
224
Colonel Willett reports to the Governor the presence of a party
230
Governor Clinton suggests to Governor Trumbull the necessity
234
General Scott and Mr Ward to the Governor relative to Colonel
241
Lieutenant Caleb Brewster calls Governor Clintons attention
246
Dominie de Roude fails to secure exemption for his sons from
248
Colonel Willett mildly criticises Governor Clinton who promptly
252
Letter from Governor Clinton to delegates in Congress in favor
259
Captain Elihu Marshall notifies the Governor that he is stationed
265
Respecting exchange of prisonersThe Board of Commissioners
271
Governor Clinton calls Colonel Weissenfels to account for an out
275
Governor Clinton to General Stark regarding flags and exchanges
282
Governor Clinton to General Heath on the enemys method
288
General Heath informs Governor Clinton he is watching for
294
William Spotten transmits letters and information bearing
300
General Ileath to Governor Clinton regarding the frontier
302
Ezra lIlommedieu predicts the downfall of Cornwallis and
308
Captain Job Wright ordered to command levies at Saratoga
314
Commissioners at Albany to Governor Clinton as to sundry
320
A return of levies
326
Jacob Cuyler to Robert BensonAs to certificate issued
369
First parallel begun at YorktownColonel John Lamb forwards
376
George Clinton to Colonel WillettIn regard to clothingArrival
377
Governor Clinton to Governor Trumbull in regard to Woolsey
383
Robert Benson to General Heath in regard to the protection of
389
General Van Rensselaer ordered to be ready to move at a moments
393
General Heath to Governor ClintonConcerned over the question
399
John Tayler to Governor ClintonClever device of Mr Wood
405
Jacobus Wynkoop remonstrates against a court martial finding 409
409
Captain E Marshall to Governor ClintonThe alarm at German
413
Distressed condition of our financesRobert Morris circular letter
421
Officers delegate Captain Dodge to represent them on the clothing
430
Colonel Hay to Governor ClintonAccount of all tax certificates
436
Abram Skinner Commissary General of Prisoners from Elizabeth
439
Lord Stirling informs the Governor of Colonel Willetts victory
447
Loyalty of Morris Hazzard suspectedCorrespondence from Gen
453
Governor Clinton to Colonel Willett in regard to mustering levies 457
457
Keziah Townsends letter relative to obtaining her effects from
460
James Hamilton narrates his grievances to Governor Clinton
468
General Ten Broeck to Governor Clinton touching complications
475
Colonel Allison to Governor Clinton in regard to money advanced
481
Colonel Willett informs Governor Clinton he would have done
487
General Heath apprehensive that the enemy meditates an attack
491
Governor Clinton directs Captain Honeywell to impress hogs
496
General Heath represents the desperate condition of the troops
502
Governor Clinton assures Dominie Gros he is always anxiously
508
Governor Clinton to R R Livingston in regard to the wanton
514
A strong defence of the States positionGovernor Clinton
520
Governor Clinton to General Heath as to the Disposal of
526
James Duane notifies Governor Clinton that New York State
533
Governor Clinton to John Morin Scott in relation to New York
539
A statement of Governor Clintons financial transactions with
548
Governor Clinton writes to Isaac Roosevelt regarding Mr Wrights
550
Solomon Pendleton depicts to Governor Clinton the situation
556
Governor Clinton notifies Governor Livingston he has granted
562
Governor Clinton to General HeathA proposition to adjudicate
566
The several States called upon to fill their quotas by the first
572
Colonel Peter Yates reports to General Gansevoort the situation
579
Colonel Abbott notifies Colonel Van Rensselaer that negotiations
585
Captain Thomas Machin praises the Governors nephewThe
586
Indications that the conditions at Schaghticoke are uncertain
591
Governor Clinton to General Moylan in regard to clothing 597
597
Robert R Livingston to the Governor on his retirement from
603
Treasurer Banckers letter with brigade Major Lansings ac PAGES
607
Generals Van Rensselaer and Gansevoort to Governor Clinton
618
He follows it up with a private communication to the delegates 624
624
General Heath reports to the Governor the successful expedition
625
Memorial of Charles Phelps of Cumberland County Vt
632

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الصفحة 616 - ... to sue and be sued, plead and be impleaded, answer and be answered unto, defend and be defended, in all courts of record, or any other place whatsoever...
الصفحة 508 - ... well and truly to hear and determine the matter in question, according to the best of his judgment, without favor, affection or hope of reward:" provided also that no state shall be deprived of territory for the benefit of the united states.
الصفحة xxi - ... the honor to command, he can only again offer in their behalf his recommendations to their grateful country, and his prayers to the God of armies.
الصفحة 506 - That it be and hereby is most earnestly recommended to the States of New Hampshire, Massachusetts Bay and New York, forthwith to pass Laws expressly authorizing Congress to hear and determine all differences between them relative to their respective boundaries...
الصفحة xx - What though there should be some envious individuals, who are unwilling to pay the debt the public has contracted, or to yield the tribute due to merit ; yet let such unworthy treatment produce no invective, or any instance of intemperate conduct.
الصفحة 403 - I have the honor to be With the highest respect Your Excellency's Most obedient Servant ANSON JONES WALKER TO RUNNELS.
الصفحة xx - States will prefer a national bankruptcy, and the dissolution of the union, to a compliance with the requisitions of congress, and the payment of its just debts ; so that the officers and soldiers may expect considerable assistance, in re-commencing their civil occupations, from the sums due to them from the public, which must and will most inevitably be paid.
الصفحة 509 - George Clinton Esquire, Governor of our said State, General and Commander in Chief of all the Militia and Admiral of the Navy...
الصفحة xix - ... and he will conclude the address by expressing the obligations he feels himself under for the spirited and able assistance he has experienced from them, in the performance of an arduous office. " A contemplation of the complete attainment, at a period earlier than could have been expected, of the object for which we contended, against so formidable a power, cannot but inspire us with astonishment and gratitude.
الصفحة xix - Who, that was not a witness, could imagine, that the most violent local prejudices would cease so soon ; and that men, who came from the different parts of the continent, strongly disposed by the habits of education to despise and quarrel with each other, would instantly become but one patriotic band of brothers...

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