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but seemed to have something very manly in his face; and 5 yet he had all the sweetness and softness of an European in his countenance too, especially when he smiled. His hair was long and black, not curled like wool; his forehead very high and large; and a great vivacity and sparkling sharpness in his eyes. The colour of his skin was not quite 10 black, but very tawny; and yet not of an ugly, yellow, nauseous tawny, as the Brazilians and Virginians, and other natives of America are, but of a bright kind of a dun olive colour, that had in it something very agreeable, though not very easy to describe. His face was round and plump; 15 his nose small, not flat like the negroes; a very good mouth, thin lips, and his fine teeth well set, and white as ivory.

After he had slumbered, rather than slept, about halfan-hour, he waked again, and comes out of the cave to me, for I had been milking my goats, which I had in the enclosure 20 just by. When he espied me, he came running to me, laying himself down again upon the ground, with all the possible signs of an humble, thankful disposition, making a many antic gestures to show it. At last he lays his head flat upon the ground, close to my foot, and sets my other 25 foot upon his head, as he had done before, and after this made all the signs to me of subjection, servitude, and submission imaginable, to let me know how he would serve me as long as he lived. I understood him in many things, and let him know I was very well pleased with him. In a 30 little time I began to speak to him, and teach him to speak to me; and first I made him know his name should be Friday, which was the day I saved his life. I called him so for the memory of the time. I likewise taught him to say master, and then let him know that was to be my name. I likewise 35 taught him to say Yes and No, and to know the meaning of them. I gave him some milk in an earthen pot, and let him see me drink it before him, and sop my bread in it;

and I gave him a cake of bread to do the like, which he 40 quickly complied with, and made signs that it was very

good for him.

RICHARD STEELE

Prospectus (The Tatler, No. 1. Tuesday, April 12, 1709 ) Though the other papers, which are published for the use of the good people of England, have certainly very wholesome effects, and are laudable in their particular kinds, they do not seem to come up to the main design of 5 such narrations, which I humbly presume, should be principally intended for the use of politic persons, who are so public-spirited as to neglect their own affairs to look into transactions of state. Now these gentlemen, for the most

part, being persons of strong zeal, and weak intellects, it 10 is both a charitable and necessary work to offer something,

whereby such worthy and well-affected members of the commonwealth may be instructed, after their reading, what to think; which shall be the end and purpose of this my

paper, wherein I shall, from time to time, report and con15 sider all matters of what kind soever that shall occur to me,

and publish such my advices and reflections every Tuesday, Thursday, and Saturday in the week, for the convenience of the post.

I resolve to have something which may be of entertain20 ment to the fair sex, in honor of whom I have invented the

title of this paper. I therefore earnestly desire all persons, without distinction, to take it in for the present gratis, and hereafter at the price of one penny, forbidding all hawkers

to take more for it at their peril. And I desire all persons 25 to consider, that I am at a very great charge for proper

materials for this work, as well as that, before I resolved upon it, I had settled a correspondence in all parts of the known and knowing world. And forasmuch as this globe is not trodden upon by mere drudges of business only, but that men of spirit and genius are justly to be esteemed as 30 considerable agents in it, we shall not, upon a dearth of news, present you with musty foreign edicts, and dull proclamations, but shall divide our relation of the passages which occur in action or discourse throughout this town, as well as elsewhere, under such dates of places as may prepare you 35 for the matter you are to expect in the following manner.

All accounts of gallantry, pleasure, and entertainment, shall be under the article of White's Chocolate-house; poetry, under that of Will's Coffee-house; learning, under the title of Grecian; foreign and domestic news, you will 40 have from St. James's Coffee-house; and what else I have to offer on any other subject shall be dated from my own Apartment.

I once more desire my reader to consider, that as I cannot keep an ingenious man to go daily to Will's under two-pence 45 each day, merely for his charges; to White's under sixpence; nor to the Grecian, without allowing him some plain Spanish, to be as able as others at the learned table; and that a good observer cannot speak with even Kidney at St. James's without clean linen; I say, these considera- 50 tions will, I hope, make all persons willing to comply with my humble request (when my gratis stock is exhausted) of a penny apiece; especially since they are sure of some proper amusement, and that it is impossible for me to want means to entertain them, having, besides the force of my 55 own parts, the power of divination, and that I can, by casting a figure, tell you all that will happen before it comes to pass.

But this last faculty I shall use very sparingly, and speak but of few things until they are passed, for fear of divulging matters which may offend our superiors.

60 Mr. Bickerstaff Visits a Friend

(The Tatler, No. 95. November 17, 1709.) There are several persons who have many pleasures and entertainments in their possession, which they do not enjoy. It is, therefore, a kind and good office to acquaint them with their own happiness, and turn their attention to such 5 instances of their good fortune as they are apt to overlook. Persons in the married state often want such a monitor; and pine away their days, by looking upon the same condition in anguish and murmur, which carries with it in the opin

ion of others a complication of all the pleasures of life, and 10 a retreat from its inquietudes.

I am led into this thought by a visit I made an old friend, who was formerly my school-fellow. He came to town last week with his family for the winter, and yesterday morn

ing sent me word his wife expected me to dinner. I am, 15 as it were, at home at that house, and every member of it

knows me for their well-wisher. I cannot indeed express the pleasure it is, to be met by the children with so much joy as I am when I go thither. The boys and girls strive

who shall come first, when they think it is I that am knock20 ing at the door; and that child which loses the race to me

runs back again to tell the father it is Mr. Bickerstaff. This day I was led in by a pretty girl, that we all thought must have forgot me; for the family has been out of town these

two years. Her knowing me again was a mighty subject 25 with us, and took up our discourse at the first entrance.

After which, they began to rally me upon a thousand little stories they heard in the country, about my marriage to one of my neighbour's daughters. Upon which the gentle

man, my friend, said, “Nay, if Mr. Bickerstaff marries a 30 child of any of his old companions, I hope mine shall have

the preference; there is Mrs. Mary is now sixteen, and would make him as fine a widow as the best of them. But I know him too well; he is so enamoured with the very memory of those who flourished in our youth, that he will not so much as look upon the modern beauties. I remember, 35 old gentleman, how often you went home in a day to refresh your countenance and dress when Teraminta reigned in your heart. As we came up in the coach, I repeated to my wife some of your verses on her.” With such reflections on little passages which happened long ago, we passed our 40 time, during a cheerful and elegant meal.

After dinner, his lady left the room, as did also the children. As soon as we were alone, he took me by the hand; “Well, my good friend," says he, “I am heartily glad to see thee; I was afraid you would never have seen all the com- 45 pany that dined with you to-day again. Do not you think the good woman of the house a little altered since you followed her from the playhouse, to find out who she was, for

I perceived a tear fall down his cheek, as he spoke, which moved me not a little.

But, to turn the discourse, I said, “She is not indeed quite that creature she was, when she returned me the letter I carried from you; and told me, ‘she hoped, as I was a gentleman, I would be employed no more to trouble her, who had never offended me; but would be so much 55 the gentleman's friend, as to dissuade him from a pursuit, which he could never succeed in. You may remember, I thought her in earnest; and you were forced to employ your cousin Will, who made his sister get acquainted with her, for you. You cannot expect her to be for ever fifteen.” 60

"Fifteen!” replied my good friend : "Ah! you little understand, you that have lived a bachelor, how great, how exquisite a pleasure there is, in really being beloved! It is impossible, that the most beauteous face in nature should raise in me such pleasing ideas, as when I look upon that 65

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