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256

c H A P. III. Within these smooth fac'd feas strange creatures crawl; But in man's heart far stranger than them all,

24 CH A P. IV. Seas purge themselves, and cast their filth ashore, But graceless souls retain, and suck in more,

252 с н А Р. V. Seamen foresee a danger, and prepare : Yet few of greater dangers are aware,

254 C HA P. VI. How small a matter turns a fhip about? Yet we, against our conscience, ftand it out,

с нА Р. VII. Thro' many fears and dangers seamen run, Yet all's forgotten when they do return,

259 с н А Р. VIII. The navigator shifts his fails to take All winds, but that which for his soul doth make, 263

с нА Р. IX.
If feamen lose a gale, there they may lie ;
The foul, when once becalm'd in sin, may die, 265

CH A P. X.
By navigation one place stores another,
And by communion we must help each other,

CH A P. XI.
The rocks abide, though seas against them rage ;
So fhall the church, which is God's heritage, 270

CH A P. XII.
What dangers run they for a little gains,
Who, for their fouls, would ne'er take half the pains ! 273

С Н А Р. XIII.
Millions of creatures in the feas are fed :
Why then are faints in doubt of daily bread?

275
с н л Р.
Sea-waters drained through the earth, are sweet ;
Sa are th' afflictions which God's people meet,

CH A P. XV.
The feas within their bounds the Lord contains :
He also men and devils holds in chains,

281
CH A P. XVI.
To fea without a compass none dare go:
Our course without the word is even fo,

283
CH A P. XVII.
Look as the sea, by turns, doth ebb and flow;
So their estates, that use it, come and go.

286

267

XIV.

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CHA P. XVIII. Like hungry lions, waves for finners gape: Leave then your fins behind, if you'll escape,

CH A P. XIX. To save the ship, rich lading's cast away: Thy soul is shipwreck'd if thy lusts do stay.

с н А Р. XX.
Christ, with a word, can surging waves appease:
His voice a troubled foul can quickly ease,

CH A P. XXI.
Our food out of the sea God doth command;
Yet few therein take notice of his hand,

c H A P. XXII. Whilft thou by art the filly fish doft kill, Perchance the devil's hook sticks in thy gill,

С Н А Р. XXIII.
Doth trading fail, and voyages prove bad?
If you cannot discern the cause, 'tis faid,

CHA P. XXIV.
In seas the greater fifh the less devour :
So fome men crush all those within their pow'r,
с нА Р.

XXV.
In storms to spread much fail endangers all :
So carnal mirth, if God for mourning call,

CH A P. XXVI.
A little leak neglected, dangerous proves :
One sin connived at, the soul undoes,

CH A P. XXVII.
Ships make much way when they a trade-wind get;
With such a wind the faints have ever met,

с НА Р. XXVIII. Storms make discov'ry of the pilot's skill : God's wisdom in affliction triumphs still,

сн А Р. XXIX. Things in the bottom are unseen: no eye Can trace God's paths, which in the deeps do lie,

CH A P. XXX.
Millions of men are sunk into the main ;
But it shall not those dead always retain,

Сн А Р. XXXI.
The seaman's greatest danger's near the coast;
When we are nearest heav'n the danger's most,

с н А Р. XXXII.
How glad are feamen when they make the shore?
And saints, no less, when all their danger's o’er.

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A Dissuasive from the Sins of Drunkennefs, Swear

ing, L'ncleanness, forgetfulness of Mercies, &c.

Pa

386

The Epistle Dedicatory,

32 Caution 1. Of the Sin of Drunkenness,

32 Caution 2. The Art of Preserving the Fruits of the Lips, 340 Caution 3. The Harlot's Face, in the Scripture-Glass,

357 Guztion 4. Of Mercies and Promises,

362 Gaution 5. The Seaman's Catechism,

372 The SE A MAN'S COMPANION. The Epistle Dedicatory,

383 S E R M O N I.

The Seaman's Farewel. Afts xxi, 5, 6. " And we kneeled down on the shore, and * prayed; and when we had taken our leave one of apother, ve took ship, and they returned home again,”

S E RM 0 N II.

The Seaman in a Storm.
Psal. cvii. 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28. " They that go down to

“ the sea in thips, that do business in great waters: these
“ see the works of the Lord, and his wonders in the deep,”
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SE R M O N III.
The Seaman's Preservative in foreign countries.
Psalm cxxxix. 9, 10. “ If I take the wings of the morning,

“ and dwell in the uttermost part of the sea; even there
“ shall thy hand lead me, and thy right hand shall hold me, " 419

SER Μ Ο Ν IV.

The successful Seaman. venit. viii. 17, 18. “And thou say in thine heart, My power, " and the might of my hand hath gotten me this wealth ; “ but thou shalt remember the Lord thy God; for it is be “ that giveth thee power to get weakh,"

434 .

S E R Μ Ο Ν

The disappointed Seaman. Le v. 5.“ Maste

" Master; we have toiled all the night, and have taken nothing,"

445
S E R M ON VI.

The Seaman's Return.
De. xxxiii. 19. “They shall call the people unto the moun.

‘tain, there they hall offer facrifices of righteousness : for
'they shall suck of the abundance of the feas, and of the
"treasures hid in the sand,"

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H U S B A N DRY S P I RI I U Á LIZ E D:

Or, The Heavenly Use of Earthly THINGS.

Conffting of many pleasant obfervations, pertinent applicati

ons, and ferious reflections, and each chapter concluded with a divine, and suitable poem. Directing husbandmen to the most excellent improvements of their common employments. Whereunto are added, by way of Appendix, several choice occafional meditations, upon birds, beasts, trees, flowa ers, rivers, and several other objects ; fitted for the help of fuch as desire to walk with God in all their folitudes, and recefses from the world.

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THE EPISTLE DEDICATOR Y. To the Worshipful Robert SAVERY, and WILLIAM SA

VERY, of Slade Esquires.

I

Honoured Friends,
T hath been long since observed, that the world, below, is

a glass to discover the world above; Seculum eft speculum : and although I am not of their opinion, that say, the Heathens may spell Chrift out of the sun, moon, and stars ; yet this I know, that the irrational and inanimate, as well as rational ereatures, have a language, and tho' not by articulate speech, yet, in a metaphorical sense, they preach unto man the wisdom, power, and goodness of God, Rom. i. 20. “ There is (faith as the Pfalmift, Pfalm xix. 3.) no speech, nor language, where “ their voice is not heard," Or (as Junius renders it) there is no speech, nor words, yet without these, their voice is underftood, and their line (i. e. faith Diodate) their writing in gross, and plain draughts, is gone out through all the earth.

As man is compounded of a fleshly and fpiritual substance, fo God hath endowed the creatures with a spiritual, as well as feshly usefulness; they have not only a natural use in alimen. VOL. VI.

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tal, and physical respects, but also a spiritual use, as they bear the figures and fimilitudes of many sublime and heavenly my. Itèries. Believe me (faith contemplative Bernard) thou shalt find more in the woods, than in a corner; stones and trees will teach thee what thou shalt not hear from learned doctors. By a skilful and industrious improvement of the creatures (faith Mr. Baxter excellently) we might have a fuller taste of Chrift and heaven, in every bit of bread that we eat, and in every draught of bear that we drink, than most men have in the use of the facrament.

And as the creatures teach divine and excellent things, so they teach them in a perspicuous and taking manner : Duo illa nos maxime movent, fimilitudo et exemplim, faith the orator *. These two things, fimilitude and example, do especially move us. Notions are more easily conveyed to the underitanding, by being first cloathed in some apt fimilitude, and so represented to the sense. And therefore Jesus Christ, the great Prophet, delighted much in teaching by parables; and the prophets were much in this way also, Hof. xii. 10. “ I have used fimilitudes

by the ministry of the prophets." Those that can retain little of a fermon, yet crdinarily retain an apt fimilitude.

I confess it is an humbling confideration, That man, who at first was led by the knowledge of God, to the knowledge of the creature, muft now by the creatures learn to know God. That the creatures, (as one faith) like Balaam's afs, should teach their master. But though this be the unhappiness of poor man in his collapsed state, yet it is now his wisdom to improve such helps; and whilst others, by the abuse of the creatures, are furthering their perdition, to be, by the spiritual improvement of them, promoting our own salvation.

It is an excellent art to discourse with birds, beasts, and fish es, about sublime and spiritual subjects, and make them anfwer to your questions; and this may be done, Job xii. 7,8. “ Ask «s now the beasts, and they shall teach thee, and the fowls of the « air, and they shall tell thee; or speak to the earth, and it shall « teach thee, and the fishes of the fea shall declare unto thee." That is (faith neat and accurate + Caryl) the creatures teach us when we think of them : • They teach us, though not for“mally, yet virtually; they answer and resolve the question

put to them, though not explicitely to the ear, yet convine,

cingly to the conscience. So then, we ask the creatures, ( when we diligently consider them, when we search out the "rerfections and virtues that God hath put into, or stampe * Cicero,

† Caryl in loc.

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