Études de littrature, ancienne & trangre

 

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250 - We have but collected them, and done an office to the dead, to procure his orphans guardians; without ambition either of self-profit or fame; only to keep the memory of so worthy a friend and fellow alive as was our Shakespeare, by humble offer of his plays to your most noble patronage.
233 - Your monument shall be my gentle verse, Which eyes not yet created shall o'er-read ; And tongues to be, your being shall rehearse, When all the breathers of this world are dead ; You still shall live (such virtue hath my pen) Where breath most breathes, even in the mouths of men.
231 - Desiring this man's art and that man's scope, With what I most enjoy contented least; Yet in these thoughts myself almost despising, Haply I think on thee...
230 - O ! for my sake do you with Fortune chide The guilty goddess of my harmful deeds, That did not better for my life provide Than public means which public manners breeds. Thence comes it that my name receives a brand, And almost thence my nature is subdu'd To what it works in, like the dyer's hand...
234 - Give salutation to my sportive blood ? Or on my frailties why are frailer spies, Which in their wills count bad what I think good ? No, I am that I am, and they that level At my abuses reckon up their own: I may be straight, though they themselves be bevel; By their rank thoughts my deeds must not be shown; Unless this general evil they maintain, All men are bad and in their badness reign.
243 - Sweet Swan of Avon ! what a sight it were To see thee in our waters yet appear, And make those flights upon the banks of Thames, That so did take Eliza, and our James...
300 - Bible hbraque ; puis il travaillait son pome, dont il dictait les vers sa femme, ou quelquefois un ami, un tranger qui le visitait. La musique tait une de ses distractions ; il touchait de l'orgue, et chantait avec got. Au milieu de cette vie simple et occupe, le Paradis perdu, si longtemps mdit, s'acheva promptement.
300 - ... avaient achev d'ter tout frein son imagination, et lui donnaient quelque chose d'imptueux et d'illimit, comme les rves du fanatisme. A tant de sources d'originalit il faut joindre cette fconde imitation de la posie antique, qui nourrissait la verve de Milton. Homre, aprs la Bible, avait toujours t sa premire lecture; il le savait presque par cur, et l'tudiait sans cesse. Aveugle et solitaire, ses heures taient partages entre la composition potique et le...
122 - ... exemple que Shakspeare , dont le gnie fier et libre n'a jamais t mieux inspir que par Plutarque, et qui lui doit les scnes les plus sublimes et les plus naturelles de son Coriolan et de son Jules Csar ? Montaigne, Montesquieu , Rousseau, sont encore trois grands gnies sur lesquels on retrouve l'empreinte de Plutarque, et qui ont t frapps et colors par sa lumire. Cette immortelle vivacit du style de Plutarque, s'unissant l'heureux choix des plus grands sujets qui puissent...
233 - Your name from hence immortal life shall have, Though I, once gone, to all the world must die : The earth can yield me but a common grave, When you entombed in men's eyes shall lie. Your monument shall be my gentle verse, Which eyes not yet created shall o'er-read, And tongues to be your being shall rehearse When all the breathers of this world are dead...