Lays and Legends of Germany

الغلاف الأمامي
G. Cowie, 1834 - 274 من الصفحات
 

ما يقوله الناس - كتابة مراجعة

لم نعثر على أي مراجعات في الأماكن المعتادة.

طبعات أخرى - عرض جميع المقتطفات

عبارات ومصطلحات مألوفة

مقاطع مشهورة

الصفحة viii - And thorough this distemperature, we see The seasons alter : hoary-headed frosts Fall in the fresh lap of the crimson rose : And on old Hyems' chin and icy crown, An odorous chaplet of sweet summer buds Is, as in mockery, set.
الصفحة iv - A work of great interest might be compiled upon the origin of popular fiction, and the transmission of similar tales from age to age, and from country to country.
الصفحة 120 - And he, by Friar's lantern led, Tells how the drudging goblin sweat, To earn his cream bowl duly set...
الصفحة 41 - THE LITTLE SHROUD. SHE put him on a snow-white shroud, A chaplet on his head ; And gathered early primroses To scatter o'er the dead. She laid him in his little grave — 'Twas hard to lay him there, When spring was putting forth its flowers, And everything was fair. She had lost many children — now The last of them was gone ; And day and night she sat and wept Beside the funeral stone. One midnight, while her constant tears Were falling with the dew She heard...
الصفحة x - Persia, shall conclude our list of authorities:—"! quite understand, my good friend," said I, " the contempt you bestow upon the nursery tales with which the Hajee and I have been entertaining each other; but believe me, he who desires to be well acquainted with a people, will not reject their popular stories, or local superstitions.
الصفحة 42 - I cannot sleep, Your tears have made my shroud so wet : Oh, mother, do not weep ! " Oh ! love is strong ! the mother's heart Was filled with tender fears ; Oh ! love is strong ! and for her child Her grief restrained its tears. One eve a light shone round her bed, And there she saw him stand— Her infant, in his little shroud, A taper in his hand. "Lo ! mother, see my shroud is dry, And I can sleep ouce more!
الصفحة 170 - Mirth, on the contrary, is the consort of concealed spite, and if not invariably wicked or mischievous, yet always blending itself readily with wickedness and mischief. Sport, even when intended to be innocent, degrades its object ; though the best and wisest of us cannot always resist the temptation of deriving pleasure from the pains which we inflict upon our fellow-creatures by amusing ourselves with their weakness. From this alliance between laughter and malice arose the burlesque malignants...
الصفحة 240 - The lady returns safe; but at midnight the frog lover appears at the door and demands entrance according to promise, to the great consternation of the lady and her nurse. Open the door, my hinny, my heart; Open the door, mine ain wee thing; And mind the words that you and I spak Down in the meadow at the well-spring.
الصفحة 39 - It was not long afterwards before the shoemaker visited, courted, and married her. Some years after their marriage, she chanced to go one Sunday, about the hour of vespers, to the trunk, in search of something which she required for her work on the following day. As she opened her trunk, her husband came to her, and would insist on looking into it ; she kept him off, until at last he pushed her away with great violence, looked into her trunk, and there saw his dagger.
الصفحة 42 - Twas hard to lay him there, When spring was putting forth its flowers, And everything was fair. She had lost many children — now The last of them was gone ; And day and night she sat and wept Beside the funeral stone. One midnight, while her constant tears Were falling with the dew She heard a voice, and lo ! her child Stood by her weeping too ! His shroud was damp, his face was white, He said...

معلومات المراجع