Gilpin's Forest Scenery

الغلاف الأمامي
Sampson Low, Marston, Searle, & Rivington, 1883 - 371 من الصفحات
 

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مقاطع مشهورة

الصفحة 300 - The business of a poet," said Imlac, "is to examine, not the individual, but the species ; to remark general properties and large appearances ; he does not number the streaks of the tulip, or describe the different shades in the verdure of the forest.
الصفحة 282 - Knowledge and Wisdom, far from being one, Have oft-times no connection. Knowledge dwells In heads replete with thoughts of other men ; Wisdom in minds attentive to their own.
الصفحة 209 - The fig-tree, not that kind for fruit renown'd, But such as, at this day, to Indians known; In Malabar or Decan spreads her arms, Branching so broad and long, that in the ground The bended twigs take root, and daughters grow About the mother tree, a pillar'd shade, High overarch'd, and echoing walks between...
الصفحة 131 - Court, at any time of the year, glittering with its armed and varnished leaves ? The taller standards at orderly distances, blushing with their natural coral.
الصفحة 282 - That tinkle in the withered leaves below. Stillness, accompanied with sounds so soft, Charms more than silence. Meditation here May think down hours to moments. Here the heart May give a useful lesson to the head, And Learning wiser grow without his books.
الصفحة 217 - King William II., surnamed Rufus, being slain as before related, was laid in a cart belonging to one Purkess and drawn from hence to Winchester and buried in the cathedral church of that city.
الصفحة 103 - Behold, the Assyrian was a cedar in Lebanon with fair branches, and with a shadowing shroud, and of an high stature ; and his top was among the thick boughs.
الصفحة 347 - O'er all the soul his sacred influence breathes! Inflames imagination; through the breast Infuses every tenderness; and far Beyond dim earth exalts the swelling thought.
الصفحة 198 - There is an old tale goes, that Herne the hunter, Sometime a keeper here in Windsor forest, Doth all the winter time, at still midnight, Walk round about an oak, with great ragg'd horns ; And there he blasts the tree, and takes the cattle; And makes milch-kine yield blood, and shakes a chain In a most hideous and dreadful manner...
الصفحة 343 - But see the fading many-coloured woods, Shade deepening over shade, the country round Imbrown ; a crowded umbrage dusk and dun, Of every hue, from wan declining green To sooty dark.

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