Sidath Sangarawa: A Grammar of the Singhalese Language

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W. Skeen, government printer, 1852 - 247 من الصفحات

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الصفحة ccxviii - Therefore if I know not the meaning of the voice, I shall be unto him that speaketh a barbarian, and he that speaketh shall be a barbarian unto me.
الصفحة ccxviii - I shall be sanctified in you before their eyes ; for I will take you from among the heathen, and gather you out of all countries, and will bring you into your own land. Then will I sprinkle clean water upon you, and ye shall be clean ; from all your filthiness, and from all your idols will I cleanse you.
الصفحة lxxxv - AND seeing the multitudes, he went up into a mountain : and •when he was set, his disciples came unto him. 2 And he opened his mouth, and taught them, saying, 3 Blessed are the poor in spirit : for theirs is the kingdom of heaven.
الصفحة lxxxii - When lovely woman stoops to folly, And finds too late that men betray ; What charm can soothe her melancholy, What art can wash her guilt away ? The only art her guilt to cover, To hide her shame from every eye, To give repentance to her lover, And wring his bosom — is to die.
الصفحة cclxiii - ... the diction is in a great measure casual and mutable; many of their terms are formed for some temporary or local convenience and though current at certain times and places are in others utterly unknown. This fugitive cant, which is always in a state of increase or decay, cannot be regarded as any part of the durable materials of a language and therefore must be suffered to perish with other things unworthy of preservation.
الصفحة cclxxvi - The great pest of speech is frequency of translation. No book was ever turned from one language into another without imparting something of its native idiom...
الصفحة lxxvii - I know there are figures for this kind of speech, that some of the greatest ancients have been guilty of it, and that Aristotle himself has given it a place in his Rhetoric among the beauties of that art. But as it is in itself poor and trifling, it is I think at present universally exploded by all the masters of polite writing. The last fault which I shall take notice of in Milton's style, is the frequent use of what the learned call technical words, or terms of art.
الصفحة xliv - The Sanscrit language, whatever be its antiquity, is of a wonderful structure; more perfect than the Greek, more copious than the Latin, and more exquisitely refined than either, yet bearing to both of them a stronger affinity, both in the roots of verbs and in the forms of grammar, than could possibly have been produced by accident; so strong indeed, that no philologer could examine them all three, without believing them to have sprung from some common source, which, perhaps, no longer exists...
الصفحة ccxlviii - He that has long cultivated another language, will find its words and combinations crowd upon his memory; and haste and negligence, refinement and affectation, will obtrude borrowed terms and exotic expressions.
الصفحة ciii - ... discriminations of character, and the tendency of the passions, either single or combined ; and physiology must supply him with illustrations and images. To put these materials to poetical use, is required an imagination capable of painting nature, and realizing fiction.

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