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Or their fond parents dressed in red and gold;
Or where the pictures for the page atone,
And Quarles I is saved by Beauties not his
own.

140 Here swells the shelf with Ogilby the great;? There, stamped with arms, Newcastle shines

complete : 3 Here all his suffering brotherhood retire, And ’scape the martyrdom of jakes and fire : A Gothic Library! of Greece and Rome 145 Well purged, and worthy Settle, Banks, and

Broome.“

i See Imitations of Horace, Bk. ii. Ep. i. 387.

2 “ John Ogilby was one who, from a late initiation into literature, made such a progress as might well style him the prodigy of his time, in sending into the world so many Large Volumes! His translations of Homer and Virgil, done to the life, and with such excellent sculptures! And (what added great grace to his works) he printed them all on special good paper, and in a very good letter.”--Winstanley, Lives of Poets.-P. Ogilby (1600-1676) translated the Æneid, the Iliad and Odyssey, and Æsop.

3 “The Duchess of Newcastle was one who busied herself in the ravishing delights of Poetry ; leaving to posterity in print three ample Volumes of her studious endeavours." — Winstanley, ibid. Langbaine reckons up eight Folios of her Grace's, which were usually adorned with gilded covers, and had her coat of arms upon them.-P. Margaret, Duchess of Newcastle (1624-1673), a voluminous writer of plays, poems, and philosophical and other works.

4 The Poet has mentioned these three authors in particular, as they are parallel to our Hero in his three capacities : 1. Settle was his brother Laureate; only indeed upon half-pay, for the City instead of the Court; but equally famous for unintelligible flights in his poems on public occasions, such as Shows, Birth-days, &c. 2. Banks was his Rival in Tragedy (though more successful) in one of his Tragedies, the Earl of Essex, which is yet alive ; Anna Boleyn, the Queen of Scots, and Cyrus the Great, are dead and

The Frippery of crucified Molière ;?
There hapless Shakespear, yet of Tibbald sore,
Wished he had blotted for himself before, 3
The rest on Out-side merit but presume, 135
Or serve (like other Fools) to fill a room ;
Such with their shelves as due proportion hold,

1 “ When I fitted up an old play, it was as a good housewife will mend old linen, when she has not better employment.” Life, p. 217, 8vo.-P. W. Cibber's “Non-juror” was founded on the “Tartuffe" of Molière.

2 It is not to be doubted but Bays was a subscriber to Tibbald's Shakespear. He was frequently liberal this way; and, as he tells us, “subscribed to Mr. Pope's Homer, out of pure Generosity and Civility; but when Mr. Pope did so to his Nonjuror, he concluded it could be nothing but a joke.Letter to Mr. P., p. 24. This Tibbald, or Theobald, published an edition of Shakespear, of which he was so proud himself as to say, in one of Mist's Journals, June 8, “ That to expose any Errors in it was impracticable." And in another, April 27, “That whatever care might for the future be taken by any other Editor, he would still give above five hundred emendations, that shall escape them all.”-P. W.

3 It was a ridiculous praise which the Players gave to Shakespear, “that he never blotted a line.” Ben Jonson honestly wished he had blotted a thousand ; and Shakespear would certainly have wished the same, if he had lived to see those alterations in his works, which, not the Actors only (and especially the daring Hero of this poem) have made on the Stage, but the presumptuous Critics of our days in their Editions. —P. W.

4 This library is divided into three parts ; the first consists of those authors from whom he stole, and whose works he mangled ; the second, of such as fitted the shelves, or were gilded for show, or adorned with pictures ; the third class our author calls solid learning, old Bodies of Divinity, old Commentaries, old English Printers, or old English Translations; all very voluminous, and fit to erect altars to Dulness. -P. W.

own.

Or their fond parents dressed in red and gold;
Or where the pictures for the page atone,
And Quarles? is saved by Beauties not his

140 Here swells the shelf with Ogilby the great; There, stamped with arms, Newcastle shines

complete : Here all his suffering brotherhood retire, And 'scape the martyrdom of jakes and fire : A Gothic Library! of Greece and Rome 145 Well purged, and worthy Settle, Banks, and

Broome.

1 See Imitations of Horace, Bk. ii. Ep. i. 387.

2 John Ogilby was one who, from a late initiation into literature, made such a progress as might well style him the prodigy of his time, in sending into the world so many Large Volumes! His translations of Homer and Virgil, done to the life, and with such excellent sculptures! And (what added great grace to his works) he printed them all on special good paper, and in a very good letter.”--Winstanley, Lives of Poets.-P. Ogilby (1600-1676) translated the Æneid, the Iliad and Odyssey, and Æsop.

3 “ The Duchess of Newcastle was one who busied herself in the ravishing delights of Poetry ; leaving to posterity in print three ample Volumes of her studious endeavours." - Winstanley, ibid. Langbaine reckons up eight Folios of her Grace's, which were usually adorned with gilded covers, and had her coat of arms upon them.-P. Margaret, Duchess of Newcastle (1624-1673), a voluminous writer of plays, poems, and philosophical and other works.

4 The Poet has mentioned these three authors in particular, as they are parallel to our Hero in his three capacities : i. Settle was his brother Laureate; only indeed upon half-pay, for the City instead of the Court ; but equally famous for unintelligible flights in his poems on public occasions, such as Shows, Birth-days, &c. 2. Banks was his Rival in Tragedy (though more successful) in one of his Tragedies, the Earl of Essex, which is yet alive ; Anna Boleyn, the Queen of Scots, and Cyrus the Great, are dead and

But, high above, more solid Learning shone, The Classics of an Age that heard of none; There Caxton ? slept, with Wynkyn at his side, One clasped in wood, and one in strong cowhide ;

150 There saved by spice, like mummies, many a

year, Dry Bodies of Divinity appear; De Lyra there a dreadful front extends, And here the groaning shelves Philemon bends. Of these twelve volumes, twelve of amplest size,

155 Redeemed from tapers and defrauded pies, Inspired he seizes : these an altar raise :

gone. Those he dressed in a sort of Beggar's Velvet, or a happy Mixture of the thick Fustian and thin Prosaic; exactly imitated in Perolla and Isidora, Cæsar in Egypt, and the Heroic Daughter. 3. Broome was a serving-man of Ben Jonson, who once picked up a Comedy from his Betters, or from some cast scenes of his Master, not entirely contemptible.-P. W.

1 Some have objected, that books of this sort suit not so well the library of our Bays, which they imagine consisted of Novels, Plays, and obscene books; but they are to consider, that he furnished his shelves only for ornament, and read these books no more than the Dry Bodies of Divinity, which, no doubt, were purchased by his father when he designed him for the Gown. See the note on verse 200.-P. W.

2 A printer in the time of Edward IV., Richard III., and Henry VII. ; Wynkyn de Word, his successor, in that of Henry VII. and VIII.-P.

3 Nich. de Lyra, or Harpsfield, a very voluminous commentator, whose works, in five vast folios, were printed in 1472.-P. . 4 Philemon Holland, Doctor in Physic. “He translated so many books, that a man would think he had done nothing else ; insomuch that he might be called Translator general of his age. The books alone of his turning into English are sufficient to make a Country Gentleman a complete library.- Winstanley.-P.

An hecatomb of pure, unsullied lays
That altar crowns : A folio Common-place
Founds the whole pile, of all his works the
base :

160 Quartos, octavos, shape the lessening pyre; A twisted Birth-day Ode completes the spire.

Then he: “Great Tamer of all human art ! First in my care, and ever at my heart; Dulness! whose good old cause I yet defend, 165 With whom my Muse began, with whom shall

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E'er since Sir Fopling's Periwig was Praise,
To the last honours of the Butt and Bays:
O thou! of Business the directing soul!
To this our head like bias to the bowl, i 170
Which, as more ponderous, made its aim more

true,

Obliquely waddling to the mark in view :
0! ever gracious to perplexed mankind,
Still spread a healing mist before the mind;
And, lest we err by Wit's wild dancing light,
Secure us kindly in our native night. 176
Or, if to Wit a coxcomb make pretence,
Guard the sure barrier between that and Sense ;
Or quite unravel all the reasoning thread,
And hang some curious cobweb in its stead! 180

1“A te principium, tibi desinet.”Virg. Ecl. viii. ’Ex Aids åpxó peota, kai eic Aia Nńyere, Moīgai.Theoc. “Prima dicte mihi, summa dicende Camæna.”

Hor.-P. 2 The first visible cause of the passion of the Town for our Hero, was a fair flaxen full-bottomed periwig, which, he tells us, he wore in his first play of the Fool in Fashion. This remarkable periwig usually made its entrance upon the stage in a sedan, brought in by two chairmen, with infinite approbation of the audience. --P. W.

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