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and Lord Townly. He spoke highly of the first, but with the most unqualified applause of the two last, which were perfect models of ease and good breeding. To these testimonies we shall add that of an Irish Barrister, of great eminence, who died about thirty years ago, and who was always considered not more eminent in the walks of his profession than in those of dramatic criticism. From him we have been informed, “ that whatever Wilks did upon the stage, let it be ever so trifling, whether it consisted in putting on his gloves or taking out his watch, lolling on his cane or taking snuff, every movement was marked with such an ease of breeding and manner, every thing told so strongly the involuntary motion of a gentleman, that it was impossible to consider the character he represented in any other light than that of a reality.”

“ But what was still more surprising,” said the Gentleman, in relating this arecdote, “ that the person who could thus delight an audience, from the gaiety and sprightliness of his manner, I met the next day in the street hobbling to a hackney-coach, seemingly so enfeebled by age and infirmities, that I could scarcely believe him to be the same man.” Such is the power of illusion, when a great genius feels the importance of character * !”

With Wilks's general talents for tragedy, there were some parts that he was unequal to; and in particular the Ghost in Hamlet. One day, at rehearsal, Booth took the liberty to jest with him upon it. “Why, Bob,” says he, “ I thought last night you wanted to play at fisty-cuffs with me, (Booth played Hamlet to his Ghost,) you bullied me so, who, by the bye, you ought to have revered. I remember, when I acted the Ghost with Betterton, instead of my awing him, he terrified me but there was a divinity hung round that man!"

To this rebuke, Wilks, feeling its propriety, modestly replied, “ Mr. Betterton and År. Booth could always act as they pleased; but, for my part, I must do as well as I can.

* The above event took place in the year 1729, two years before the death of Wilks, who, as Cibber tells us,

was much more enfeebled by the constant irritations of his temper than he was hy his declining years."

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many Masks

225

L

Punch bought by a Lord 385
Logic; or the Art of Reason-

Preachers, Modern

• 302
ing

11

Q
Letters, the Ancient State of Quotations from other Writers 87
them in England

101

R
Lisbon, as it was
- 237 Reform

• 102
Louis VIII. of France - 296

S
Libels
• 307 Scott's Marmion

11
Love in
- 316 || Spain

30
Lope de Vega

394 Singularity of Manners
Literary Intelligence, 64, 144, 212 Superstition and Dreams

230
288, 360, 432 Strozzi, Mareschal

232
Literary Education of Women 376 | Spaniards and Portuguese 23
M
Ibid.

333
Melange-No. XI. Utility of Surnames, Ancient and Mo-
Physicians

31
dern

- 368
Dialogue between an Irish

T
Inkeeper and an English- Theoretic Speculation

109
32 Traveller, the, an Oriental
Music, Cathedral and Paro-

Apologue

297
chial

82 Turks and Greeks, their Cha-
its effets on Animals 100 racter

315
Modern Athenians
- 150 Theatrical Insolence

389
Medina Celi, Duke of

Theory against Fact

389
Military Hints

156
N

Verue, Johanna Baptista 18
Nell Gwynn
382 Villaçerfe, Madame

84
Vielleville (M. de)

386
Ossian

172

W
Our Saviour, his Character 221 Weather, the

14
Olivarez, Count
323 Whitfield, Mr.

175
Old Nick

372 | Wife, her Expenses how to be
P
regulated

223
Profession, Advantages of hav- .

her Employment for-
ing one

153
merly

299
Philip II. of Spain
322 Wealth and Rank

305
Proverb (an Old)

- 392 || Woodward, the Comedian 386

man

; 152

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REVIEW OF BOOKS.
B

F
Blind Boy, a Melo-drama 197 Frend's Evening Amusement 48
Bethan's (Matilda) Poems 262 Father's Advice to his Son at
с
School

183
Cecil's Memoirs of the Rev.

G
John Newton

112 Gilchrist's Examination of the
Cooke's Conversation -

117 Charges of Ben Jonson's
Corrie's Letters on Coffee 117 Enmity towards Shakspeare
Clarkson's History of the

177
Abolition of the Siave Trade 325
D

Harriott's Struggles through
Du Bois's Edition of Francis's

Life, continued

37
Horace

107

Raptur'd with the nervous strain,

From the mountain's side I darted ;
Swept my polish'd lyre again,

And from worldly cares departed.

While among the stars I wander'd,

Sounds sympbonious touch'd mine ears;
Round me comets fierce meander'd,

Fix'd to no peculiar spheres.

Here my heavenly Mentor left me,

Dark’ning all the concave bright;
Of his powerful aid bereft me,

And destroy'd my wonted sight.

Through the wasteful glooms I fell,

Through the londly-roaring ocean,
Till I reach'd the galph of hell,

Where I heard a wild comniotion !

'Long the dun sulphureous regions,

Far my wailings deep resounded ;
Satan, with his frantic legions,

At the noise recoil'd astounded !

Serpents now about me twin'd,

Flaky fires sear'd all my skin;
Volumes huge of noxious wind,

Fann'd the burning fames within !

Struggling from the boiling billows,

Sleep dissolv'd his genial spell;
I woke, and, 'neath the weeping willows,

View'd a newly chorded shell !?
T.C. R. Nov. 1808.

MENANDER

QUATORZAIN.

Whilst not a sound disturbs the midnight air,

And Cynthia flings her solitary gleams
Within yon dell, where slumbers wan Despair,

Who 'guiles the sad hours with fantastic dreams.com

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142, 236

DRAMA.
A

First Come first Served 209
Africans, by Mr. Colman 206 Fortune Teller

355
B

Forest of Hermanstadt 356
Barry, Spranger

345
Fletcher, John

401
Bellamy, Mrs.

137

G
Booth (Barton)

413 German Theatre, some Ac-
Beaumont (Francis)
401 count of

124
с

Garrick and Macklin, Anec-
Country Theatres.

dotes of

269
Edinburgh

62

H
Glasgow

62, 142, 358 Home, Mr. Author of Dou-
Bath-
63, 358 glas, Account of him

270
Richmond

141 Hamlet, Note on a Passage in
Manchester

141, 284
this Play

273
Brighton
142, 357

L
Worthing

London Theatres.
Sunderland

149 Drury-Lane 57, 277, 354, 425
Dublin

284, 430
Covent-Garden

59, 277
Weymouth

285 Haymarket - 61, 136, 206, 277
Shrewsbury

358

King's Theatre (Covent-Gar-
Corri, Mrs.

277 den Company) 356, 428
Cooke, Mr.

63

M
Catalani, Madame

287 || Macklin, Anecdotes of him 191
Congreve

192 Measure for Measure, Story
Covent-Garden, its Destrục-

of it

265
tion by Fire
278 || Mysterious Bride

58
intended New Mattocks, Mrs. her Retire-
Theatre

357
ment from the Stage

60
D

May, Mr.
Dramatic Performances, Re- Mudie, Mrs.

355
flection on

119

0
Drama, Lady Carlisle's opi- OʻKeeffe's Plays

201
nion of it
123 Orger, Mrs.

355
Dryden (John)
403 Otway (Thomas)

402
E

P
Essays on Literature and Hų- Passions, their Expression 122
manity-No. IV.Remarks on Play-House

267
the Drama

49 || Plays, Sir Matthew Hale's
Epilogues (humourous) after Opinion of them

273
Tragedies
343 Patrick in Prussia

342
F

Portrait of Cervantes, (C. G.) 61
Foote, Original Character of Plot and Counterplot 137

him, by Mr. Gahagan 118
Fatal Curiosity

138 Quakers, and the Stage 123

138

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Then in thee my dear girl! most distinctly I trace,

A protector-a friend 'midst the deepest of woe;
A lover, the smiles of whose elegant face,

To the keenest misfortune relief can bestow !
August 29, 1808.

HORATIO.

SONNET TO THE MOON.
Mild orb! that shinest so sereuely fair,

Thee do I court at evening's lonely hour;
When Silence awes the meditative air,

Enthron'd aloft on some stupendous tow'r.
On thy dark turrets, hideous to the eye,

Wigmore! * alone at solemn tide I've been,
Intently musing on the spangled sky,

Or, visions sporting on the distant green.
For what can equal that enchanting time,

When Fancy plumes her variegated wing;
When wrapt in dreams, the Poet looks sublime,

On those vast regions of th'eterval King;
Or, thro' the awful solitude of night,
He onward urges his impetuous flight?

TO HORATIUS.
When mild Aurora gilds my attic sphere,

O'erwbelm'd in thought I turn from side to side
On my lone couch, and oft the conscious tear,

Bids Wisdom's strongest energies subsidė.
In vain for me she decks the laughing sky

With sweetest flow'rs and hues of every sort ;
Me Recollection fondly prompts to sigh,

For her t I left at Yatton's rural court!
Nor wou'd I pray indulgent heaven to steel

This doting heart against that Power supreme;
For what am I, unless inform’d to feel

A sense of virtuous sorrow and esteem ?
A dark, disgusting creature of mankind,

of human form, but, of barbarian mind! September, 1808.

J.G.

* Wigmore Castle,-a Ruin.

+ Miss Sarah Morgan:

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